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  • luvyesmusic
    replied
    Originally posted by Dantalion Rides Again View Post
    Today I thought it'd be fun if someone had to speak only in Tales lyrics for a day.

    "Jimmy, what's up?"

    "Past present movers moments repossess the future."

    I realize it's my own self making me smile, but everyone else wasn't funny.
    I tell usually some of my customers and co-workers ( which goes back to my old thread on YES-fans, what made you laugh ) if you come up with a joke ( I have to amuse myself at times to keep my brain going ), it doesn't matter if it makes others laugh, as long as it makes you laugh, is all that really matters. I come up with some funny stuff at times, but that is reserved for my "stupid jokes". One should laugh and smile everyday. More importantly, you should make at least one other person you come across, it could be a complete stranger ( I engage with many folks old and new to me daily ), laugh or smile. It will make their day, or forget about some of the negative stuff. The same goes for yourself. :-)

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  • Ash Armstrong
    replied
    Sail the futile wars they suffer.

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  • Grey Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Dantalion Rides Again View Post
    Today I thought it'd be fun if someone had to speak only in Tales lyrics for a day.

    "Jimmy, what's up?"

    "Past present movers moments repossess the future."

    I realize it's my own self making me smile, but everyone else wasn't funny.
    Amused but real in thought, we fled from the sea whole.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dantalion Rides Again
    replied
    Today I thought it'd be fun if someone had to speak only in Tales lyrics for a day.

    "Jimmy, what's up?"

    "Past present movers moments repossess the future."

    I realize it's my own self making me smile, but everyone else wasn't funny.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gilly Goodness
    replied
    Click image for larger version  Name:	image_963.jpg Views:	3 Size:	18.8 KB ID:	10655
    Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post

    Are they species of bat?
    Marsupial bats. Can fly up to 100 km per night foraging. Many types down here. Some spread a zoonotic virus called the Hendra Virus ( from bat to to horse to human ).


    Last edited by Gilly Goodness; 03-23-2022, 01:21 PM.

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  • Ash Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by luna65 View Post
    Fourteen years ago I visited AU during the summer and it was astounding to see a group of flying foxes at dusk.
    Are they species of bat?

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  • luna65
    replied
    Originally posted by Gilly Goodness View Post
    We have a colony of 10,000 or so flying foxes near us who roost along a large creek. Wolli Creek. Wonderful to see them leave in the evenings to feast on fruit trees and suchlike. They fill the sky. As Autumn starts to bite they migrate North to warmer climes.
    Fourteen years ago I visited AU during the summer and it was astounding to see a group of flying foxes at dusk.

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  • Esthe
    replied
    Originally posted by Imperatrix View Post
    I barely go on Twitter, but every once in a while I check it for messages. I saw this, and giggled.

    ​​​​
    Surely there’s not that many people related to Yes.

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  • Imperatrix
    replied
    I barely go on Twitter, but every once in a while I check it for messages. I saw this, and giggled.

    ​​​​

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  • luvyesmusic
    replied
    I have seen those old pictures of "the tiger". Amazing looking creature.

    Some of the fossils they have found in Scotland with the huge gliding/flying beast would be scary times back in the day,

    Australia, New Zealand and Tazmania have/had quite the diversity of animals.

    Wyoming, Arizona, Utah,, New Mexico, Northern California, any place with the Rockies, Colorado and Alberta are just amazing places to go. I'm only missing North Dakota and Alaska as the two states I haven't been to. I've lived in Central America, Austria, Japan, and the Middle East, traveling to so many more places. Was fortunate to take my wife and kid to France and Bavaria before the pandemic started. I don't really see much traveling in my future. Unless I get to go to Scotland and Wales with my daughter.

    The Wholley Mammoth is one beast I would like to see brought back. A little Mammoth on the barbie would be delicious. Went to Mammoth Springs in Wyoming. Forty young male Mammoths tell into a tar pit, and the fossils we're discovered much later when they started building some town houses. Never thought I would ever make it there, when I circled that destination on a map as a young child.

    You can do just about anything you set your mind to.

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  • Gilly Goodness
    replied
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    Envy you Seeing wildlife in Seth Africa. Must be amazing. The variety and numbers. The noise and the smell.
    Have only seen large flocks of cockatoos, ibis, ducks at large inland lakes.

    Have been lucky to witness 2 very shy marsupials that most Aussies have never seen in the wild. Tassie devil. And a platypus. Saw a devil scamper across a logging road down in a Tassie forest, my art school camped for a week in. Amazing ancient forest with surging rivers the colour of foaming Guinness due to the tannins.

    The platypus was in an inland river. Diving into the water. Say both are near endangered. The devil due to facial tumors. The platypus due to habitat destruction. People also like to live near rivers and creeks.

    Now recently they have worked out the entire genome sequence of the extinct Tassie Tiger from a a formhalderhided baby. That was in a Museum. Some damage to some of the DNA sequence due to age will have to be fused with the genome of it's closest living relative the numbat.
    The Tassie Tiger looked ferocious, like a big dog with stripes, but early farmers in Van Diemans Land said some died from anxiety and fear when captured. Weren't used to captivity as the aborigines kept their distance from the carrion eaters.

    So maybe the de-extinction of the tiger will occur. As of the woolly mammoth. Who knows. The world couldn't get crazier, could it?

    Hope the bison numbers are growing back. Magnificent animals.
    Last edited by Gilly Goodness; 03-19-2022, 09:16 PM.

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  • luvyesmusic
    replied
    Originally posted by Gilly Goodness View Post
    Click image for larger version  Name:	images.jpeg-51.jpg Views:	1 Size:	28.5 KB ID:	10242

    Nice. We have a colony of 10,000 or so flying foxes near us who roost along a large creek. Wolli Creek. Wonderful to see them leave in the evenings to feast on fruit trees and suchlike. They fill the sky. As Autumn starts to bite they migrate North to warmer climes.
    Went with my dad the first time I visited him in South Africa to Kruger National Park. The size of Deleware. I saw everything but the elusive rhinos there. We were on a bridge at dusk or just after, and I couldn't believe the amount of bats that came from underneath the bridge. Pretty awesome site. I love nature and animals. The Bison is my favorite animal in North America. My daughter was making fun of me at Yellowstone. But I think the most magnificent animal is the giraffe, seeing some up close.

    I not a believer, but when you see the beauty, variety and colors of the plants and animals in South Africa, makes you really wonder.

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  • Gilly Goodness
    replied
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    Originally posted by luvyesmusic View Post
    Springtime at night is a chorus of Nature's music. All I am missing is the sound of the toads right now. Went to the clearing and saw bats for maybe the first time this year.
    Nice. We have a colony of 10,000 or so flying foxes near us who roost along a large creek. Wolli Creek. Wonderful to see them leave in the evenings to feast on fruit trees and suchlike. They fill the sky. As Autumn starts to bite they migrate North to warmer climes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ash Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by Gilly Goodness View Post
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    The ol' girl turns 90 today.

    Love goin' over it. Under it.
    Too scared of heights now to climb it.

    Never forget an English friend of mine, tearfully remembering seein' it for the first time and feelin' anything was possible for her in her new life downunder. As she gazed at the sight of it spanning the vast, emerald waters.
    On its 90th anniversary, the grandson of the iconic bridge's designer reveals what he went through to get it built.

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  • luvyesmusic
    replied
    Springtime at night is a chorus of Nature's music. All I am missing is the sound of the toads right now. Went to the clearing and saw bats for maybe the first time this year.

    Leave a comment:

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