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    Hi from new member and bass guitar digital recording

    I'm new to this forum and very glad to find other devoted Yes fans. I started listening to Yes in 1972, when I was a sophomore in high school. The first Yes songs I heard were Roundabout and Heart of the Sunrise. Not long after, I decided that I'd learn to play bass guitar like Chris Squire... ha! Still trying, after all these years, and there's never been any other band for me than Yes. I never get tired of hearing their music and trying to play Chris Squire's bass parts. I'm also trying to learn to record my bass digitally using Reaper, with a Behringer interface, in order to maker some bass covers of Yes songs for YouTube. If anyone has experience with that recording method, I'd love some tutoring/mentoring with that. Help or suggestions about would be most welcome. So, just an old Yes fan here, wondering why Yes hasn't been hailed by all the world as the best band to ever exist... I hope to hear from anyone on the forum here who likes to talk about Yes music.

    #2
    Welcome to Yesfans. I also started listening to Yes in 1972 when I was a high school sophomore as well. My instrument of choice is the guitar, and I’ve been trying to be Steve Howe for all these years, with minimal results. I am technology averse, and have also wanted to record my many compositions compiled over the years. I hope you get some guidance. There are several contributors on this site than may be able to assist you. Good luck!

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      #3
      OMG! I joined the site recently and submitted my first post a few moments ago. Happened to stumble into here. Am amazed that my post is almost exactly like the two here! I was turned on to Led Zeppelin and Yes by a buddy in high school in the late 70's. I admit that Zeppelin was my band of choice for most of the next 4 decades. I did see Yes in concert at Notre Dame in either the 70's or 80's. I admit to not remembering much of the 80's decade! Will just leave that for now. I re-discovered Yes about 4 years ago and have been obsessed ever since. I regret the 4 decades and the lost time. I have been listening to everything I can find. I admit to having a profound sense of sadness lately, and find myself crying while watching an old concert video. It seems sad and tragic that the band members can't get along and play together. Yes music brings me profound joy and happiness. I essentially miss what I missed for so many years. Do either of you have those feelings?

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        #4
        71,72 and 73, I was six, seven, and right, doing my second country tour as a government brat in Vienna, Austria. the oldest of four boys. I went to symphonies, operas, and events where waltzes were played. Somewhere during that time I had no vote to see my favorite singer ever, Olivia Newton John, that I spied a small club she was playing the next night somewhere in Portugal as we drove through.

        My parents had a very limited record collection at home. A couple of symphonia records, a Vienna Waltz album, The Baja Marimba Band Rides Again album, and my two favorite albums were Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, which began my love of the trumpet, that I played all through school once I became a certain age. .

        Cat Stevens brother in law started working with my father. Alec and Anita had no children and they were over at the house, a former embassy of a very small country, quite often. They got my parents to go out and see a couple of Cat Stevens shows, and as a result, must have had two or three of his albums which certainly hipped the house music selection up a bit.

        Tour three found us in Okinawa, Japan. My gateway time for music, and what a fantastic time it was 76,77, and 79 to be in middle school with a big boom box, and all that music. Somehow YES eluded me not having cool parents, no cool uncles overseas, and being the oldest. Surely I heard Round About, and All Good People, on the radio back home but they were never played on America:s Top Forty, The Armed Forces Radio, school dances, parties, or at the roller rink. Really had zero clue about YES .

        Tour Four found us in Aman, Jordan. Pirated cassettes were even more plentiful than Okinawa and Taiwan. I had to leave the country after six months to fulfill some school requirements. I went to a rooftop, bonfire party sometime in 81-82 which should have been my Jr. year in high school. Everyone had passed out and/or fallen asleep other than myself and a German friend. Only thing left to drink was god-awful gin. There were two cassettes left and he told me to pick one to play. I choose YES' Tomato. Future Times/Rejoice came on as I looked from the roof top, as the sun was about to break the horizon of an over 2,000 year old, sleeping city. I had never, ever, heard anything like it before. I was blown away in the very first song. A band that sounded like no other, with musicians playing instruments that sounded like no other and even the lead singer's voice was just another unique instrument. But then I was sad because even though I was unfamiliar with YES, I knew they were over. Went back to the states and bought a ticket to see Jon at a bar/club, but I wasn't old enough to get in. That was ALMOST the start of this very long YES and all things YES-related ride that surprisingly still continues to this day; unbelievably.

        ​​​​​​Other than Billy, Miguel Falco and Tony Franklin, my favorite bass player on YouTube who covers Chris parts would be Chris Tristrum. The guy sounds phenomenal, though those videos are 10-11years old. I caught him twice in Double Vision a Foreigner tribute band, and he is the touring bassist for House of Lords. He is a bad-ass on bass. Check him out, and welcome to the site.

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          #5
          Welcome aboard yesman772003 and HankCPA!

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            #6
            Thank you for responses and welcomes. Roundabob, HankCPA, loveyesmusic and kkleinschmidt, Roundabob, I have some idea how disappointing it can be to try and fail to faithfully reproduce Yes music on your chosen instrument. I constantly have to remind myself that I'm trying to reproduce music that was made by THE best bass player ever. loveyesmusic, you were kind enough to leave a nice comment on one of my YouTube vids (Future Times/Rejoice) and we exchanged a couple of very pleasant messages, so thanks for commenting here as well. It's my own laziness that's kept me from going online and trying to figure out Reaper, and I'd rather just play anyway, but i do want to make some better videos than I've been able to make so far using my phone or a camera, as sound quality is always sub par. Thanks to all again for your welcome and comments.

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              #7
              Originally posted by yesman772003 View Post

              loveyesmusic, you were kind enough to leave a nice comment on one of my YouTube vids (Future Times/Rejoice) and we exchanged a couple of very pleasant messages, so thanks for commenting here as well.
              You are a bad-ass/fantastic on bass. Very impressive! Everyone should check out your YouTube channel.
              Welcome to the site!

              You should thank John, a great musician in his own right for keeping this place going. I wish the old database of priceless posts could have transfered over, but Tim Lutterbie deserves a huge thank you, for all his efforts for two decades. Thank you. John and Tim.

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                #8
                It is so cool to be in contact with people from all over the world! I am a bit set in my ways now at age 63, and really don't get out much, pre-Covid and after. I live about a mile from the University of Notre Dame, which is the center of the universe for ND football fans. Yes did play here once in the 70's I believe. Saw the concert but those were hazy days back then. Or is it hazy memory now? Probably both. I vaguely remember Jon Anderson looked and sounded like an angel, and Chris Squire was huge in what looked like a feathered suit. (Not Big Bird) Anyway, otherwise South Bend is kind of a boring place, population of 103,000. But again, it is fascinating to know that all of you live in such cool and interesting places. This is the first fan site I have joined since around 2000 or a bit earlier. Right after the internet and chat rooms became a thing. I joined a Led Zeppelin site, and made the horrible mistake of posting a political comment. I was sanctioned and warned. Was so afraid that I never posted again, and quit the site immediately. It scarred me for life, so much that I'm not on social media! Well, that's not the reason. Anyway, sorry to rant here. I'm kind of on a pink cloud so to speak. A new experience, and if I keep my political rants to myself, it may turn out okay!

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                  #9
                  I agree, no need to talk about current or any politics on this site, unless it's concerning the politics of Yes, thru all their changes. All that's interesting, I guess, but at this point I just prefer to listen to their music and let it do to me what Yes music does... Thrill, delight, astound, inspire and rock my world like only Yes can do.

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                    #10
                    I play Yes on guitar(s). Started playing guitar in 1978. First concert ever was the 1976 Solos Tour. Steve once answered one of my questions on his former Guitar Rondo website.

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