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Favourite album out of these?

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  • alex peters
    replied
    ABWH is 1 and Tormato a close 2 for me.

    It was clear to me at least that these 4 put some time and collective effort into the album. The Live show was 1 of the best I ever saw. Very well attended!. I loved Bruford's style of playing.

    I wish these 4 had continued on to another album. Instead they put out the rushed and thrown together Union album. An album that had real potential but was clearly thrown together as if they had to get it out quickly and proceed with the tour as quickly as possible.

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  • Dantalion Rides Again
    replied
    Originally posted by Soundwaveseeker View Post

    Teakbois reminds me of material from Jon Anderson's In The City Of Angels album from the previous year. It's a fun and dancey track, not deserving of any hate.

    Quartet - not always a fan of self-referential lyrics like that and the French horn keyboards I guess doing a Beatles thing, not completely on board with this track these days. I agree, aged poorly, but the single version of I'm Alive is excellent and should have been released on the album as its own stand-alone track.

    Birthright is a classic that kinda breaks new ground with literal dramatic emotional power not usually found on a Yes album, at least not in that way. Hard to describe, but a great track.

    Vultures should have been on the album. It starts as a Howe kind thing, but that angelic last minute or so gives the same power as Awaken.
    Agree on I'm Alive single version, love it. Not a fan of Vultures, unless it's the Phish song. I've tried, just sounds wrong to me somehow.

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  • Soundwaveseeker
    replied
    Originally posted by Dantalion Rides Again View Post
    1) ABWH
    2) Tormato
    3) Time & A Word
    4) Keys 2
    5) Talk
    6) From A Page

    ABWH was in the running for my favorite Yes (related) album when I first got it. I was soooo into it. Nowadays I still love it but you have to reach for the EQ knobs for sure ... and the Brother of Mine chorus and the Quartet nostalgia passages have aged poorly to me. Jon was always trying to reinvent his lyric style which I guess he sort of had to do, but to mixed results since the mid 70s IMO.

    I am 100% good w/ The Meeting and w/ Teakbois though, don't know what people aren't smoking when they hate on those tracks. The final two numbers on ABWH are just unbelievable to me. Order of the Universe has a couple clunky lines but the ones that are good are really good. Let's Pretend used to seem awkward to me but maybe I got used to it, doesn't feel that way anymore. The "you know there's so many ways" bit is brilliant.

    I struggled to choose between ABWH & Tormato, but I meditated about it and went outside with a blindfold on and put a copy of Tormato in a pinata and ABWH in another, and set them both on fire, and if either copy played after that, I'd choose that one, and of course they were both ruined. So I just like, regular-decided.
    Teakbois reminds me of material from Jon Anderson's In The City Of Angels album from the previous year. It's a fun and dancey track, not deserving of any hate.

    Quartet - not always a fan of self-referential lyrics like that and the French horn keyboards I guess doing a Beatles thing, not completely on board with this track these days. I agree, aged poorly, but the single version of I'm Alive is excellent and should have been released on the album as its own stand-alone track.

    Birthright is a classic that kinda breaks new ground with literal dramatic emotional power not usually found on a Yes album, at least not in that way. Hard to describe, but a great track.

    Vultures should have been on the album. It starts as a Howe kind thing, but that angelic last minute or so gives the same power as Awaken.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ceasar’s Palace
    replied
    Tormato. But I wonder if I’d love it so much if it hadn't been the first album I bought...

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  • Davy
    replied
    Tormato is my favorite, followed by Talk, then the others in no particular order (except for Keys 2, which I dislike.)

    Talk was a commercial disappointment at the time, but I think I recall reading somewhere it eventually sold 300k copies? Still the bestselling Yes record since Union, dwarfing the five following releases in sales.

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  • Dantalion Rides Again
    replied
    1) ABWH
    2) Tormato
    3) Time & A Word
    4) Keys 2
    5) Talk
    6) From A Page

    ABWH was in the running for my favorite Yes (related) album when I first got it. I was soooo into it. Nowadays I still love it but you have to reach for the EQ knobs for sure ... and the Brother of Mine chorus and the Quartet nostalgia passages have aged poorly to me. Jon was always trying to reinvent his lyric style which I guess he sort of had to do, but to mixed results since the mid 70s IMO.

    I am 100% good w/ The Meeting and w/ Teakbois though, don't know what people aren't smoking when they hate on those tracks. The final two numbers on ABWH are just unbelievable to me. Order of the Universe has a couple clunky lines but the ones that are good are really good. Let's Pretend used to seem awkward to me but maybe I got used to it, doesn't feel that way anymore. The "you know there's so many ways" bit is brilliant.

    I struggled to choose between ABWH & Tormato, but I meditated about it and went outside with a blindfold on and put a copy of Tormato in a pinata and ABWH in another, and set them both on fire, and if either copy played after that, I'd choose that one, and of course they were both ruined. So I just like, regular-decided.

    Leave a comment:


  • Soundwaveseeker
    replied
    I was all into ABWH when it came out. I remember a friend told me Yes had Howe Wakeman and Bruford back - the first I had heard of the project. He said Tony Levin was on bass. I was intrigued, but was like "well, what about Chris Squire? And Alan White? They just fired him just like that?" But I liked the bright and spacey sound of the album. Still has the 80's production, but the material was more Andersonized. The first four songs on the album stand up well to almost anything Yes proper had done. Never got to see the tour though, one of the few tours I had missed. At least I got a live album out of it.

    I wasn't too worried about the official Yes, I assumed they would do an album with this Billy Sherwood guy I was hearing about. "Cool! Two Yesses!" was my attitude then and often still is. Unfortunately the Squire-led Yes with Rabin/White/Kaye didn't do an album and wouldn't be heard from a all until Union. It prefigured the ARW scenario. I always wonder what it would have been like with two Yes bands with simultaneous new albums going neck to neck. Yes & ABWH or Yes & ARW.

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  • Ash Armstrong
    replied
    Anderson Bruford Wakeman Howe for me. When it appeared, what it meant personally to me, and for what it represented at the time.
    Time and a Word and Tormato are fine albums at opposite ends of a decade which somehow seems to make them belong together, and a worthy mention for Keys 2. From a Page is a nice, albeit brief, listen without being especially arresting.
    Talk I find unlistenable. There's no reason for me to give it the time of day, so I don't.

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  • Soundwaveseeker
    replied
    Originally posted by Oldie on the Goldie View Post
    Speaking of Talk, I still find it puzzling that the album sold so poorly. I thought it was an excellent rock album - though an unusual one for Yes - that should've found broad appeal.
    I remember that came out on Victory Records in 1994. The label also had ELP and David Bowie's Tin Machine. Talk, In The Hot Seat and Tin Machin II: All three albums sold rather poorly and are seen as disappointments by some. Victory Records folded not too long afterwards I assume. I love Talk but radio was pushing the latest Nirvana album at the time. Never saw a video from the album and only might have heard The Calling maybe three times on the rock radio station. The tour didn't swing by my area until half a year later. But I was way into that album at the time. In 1994, Talk and Maillion's Brave were two albums that I noticed as making new sounds from both respectable bands. I though that in 1994 that this was the new 'progressive rock' - less traditional widdly stuff but more on the atmospheres and cinematic elements. Talk and Brave had those in vast amounts.
    Last edited by Soundwaveseeker; 04-30-2022, 02:02 PM.

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  • pianozach
    replied
    Originally posted by Oldie on the Goldie View Post
    Speaking of Talk, I still find it puzzling that the album sold so poorly. I thought it was an excellent rock album - though an unusual one for Yes - that should've found broad appeal.
    It sold poorly because Liberty Records didn't promote it in any way whatsoever. They were having financial difficulties, and folded soon after. The album is currently OOP, and isn't found on any streaming sites either (or at least the last time I checked).

    TALK is almost always one of my Top 3 Yes albums, and is currently my favorite. I had my Talk CD in the car changer for three or four years.

    Ranking the six offered up for comparison?

    1) Talk
    2) ABWH
    3) Tormato
    4) Time & A Word
    5) From A Page
    6) Keys 2

    It's just a ranking. I like or love all of these.

    I think that ABWH is a fabulous album, only knocked down for its poorly mixed bass.

    Tormato is a fun album, but Circus of Heaven and Rick's birotron knocks it down two notches.

    Time & A Word has some nice stuff, but the keys and guitar are often overpowered by the backing orchestrations.

    I'm not really all that familiar with From A Page, but I've really liked what I've heard. I've a feeling I'm rating it poorly only because of its unfamiliarity.

    Finally, Keys 2: It just seems slapped together, and has a lack of cohesiveness. It doesn't help that it's a hybrid studio/live album. There are some fabulous bass guitar sounds on it though.
    Last edited by pianozach; 04-30-2022, 06:42 AM.

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  • Roundabob
    replied
    Talk is my favorite Rabin era album, but my top choice from this group of albums is Time and a Word. I really liked the debut album, but Time and a Word (the song), Then, Sweet Dreams, and other songs on T&aW gave me a glimpse of the future, and the enormous potential of the band. The Yes Album followed T&aW, and was another giant leap forward. Those were fabulous times.

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  • Oldie on the Goldie
    replied
    Speaking of Talk, I still find it puzzling that the album sold so poorly. I thought it was an excellent rock album - though an unusual one for Yes - that should've found broad appeal.

    Leave a comment:


  • Oldie on the Goldie
    replied
    I think Talk is the best overall album out of those, but not one of my favorites so I put KTA2 because I really like Footprints and Children of Light which feel more "Yessish" to me than anything on Talk.

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  • Yesed
    replied
    I'm sure Rabin is doing something someone is enjoying. I find his solo stuff boring and generic. Both him and Anderson are useless, musically, imo. Rick is the only one that seems to have production value, and hope for some good progressive rock output. The Red Planet is good, but missing something that maybe Jon or Trevor could have participated in, to make it "epic".

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  • True
    replied
    I went with Tormato. But I think I would probably put Talk as my 2nd pick on this list. It's interesting to me that more people seem to enjoy Talk than I would have expected. I loved Talk when it came out but when I saw what a commercial disappointment it was I assumed I was the only one who liked it. I also loved the tours for both Tormato and Talk and was happy that they played a lot of material from those albums at the time.

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