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    Tom Waits - Small Change (1976)

    Streaming on Prime Music.
    Someone mentioned to me a while ago there's a complete studio albums boxset of Tom Waits in the works. That's an automatic purchase for me

    Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
    Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

    Comment


      TB3. It must be Monday..

      Comment


        Tom Waits - Heartattack and Vine (1980)

        Streaming on Prime Music platform
        Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
        Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

        Comment


          Sonic Youth - Sonic Nurse (2004)

          Deliciously dissonant and altogether splendid!

          Streaming on Prime Music, Bluetoothed through my hi-fi.
          Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
          Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

          Comment


            A walk out for supplies and provisions earlier today, a round trip of about 4 miles
            Musical accompaniment was a Yes sequence I've assembled that begins with the track Close to the Edge, and continues with Tales in its entirety. I used the 2003 deluxe edition of Tales, so as to include the ambient prelude to Revealing Science, which follows on nicely from the ambient fade-out of Close to the Edge. It's almost like a five-part album...almost as if it was meant to be, particularly since the main theme from Close to the Edge is quoted in Ritual, closing the sequence, and the circle. Very satisfying.
            Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
            Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

            Comment


              Songs of Summer playlist:

              Don Henley - The Boys of Summer (4:50)
              Sly & The Family Stone - Hot Fun in the Summertime (2:38)
              Electric Light Orchestra - One Summer Dream (5:47)
              Lovin' Spoonful - Summer in the City (2:39)
              The Motels - Suddenly Last Summer (3:38)
              The Who - Summertime Blues (3:14)
              John Travolta & Olivia Newton-John - Summer Nights (3:36)
              Bryan Adams - Summer of '69 (3:36)
              Nat King Cole - Those Lazy-Hazy-Crazy Days Of Summer (2:25)
              Mungo Jerry - In the Summertime (3:33)
              Seals & Crofts - Summer Breeze (3:29)
              The Doors - Summer's Almost Gone (3:21)
              Stray Cats - Stray Cat Strut (3:17)
              Cars - Magic (3:57)
              Jeff Tiberius Grey Wolf
              My hovercraft is full of eels

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                Various Late 70’s Genesis bootlegs.

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                  10-Song Playlist for a Monday Afternoon, Part 1 of 2

                  Public Enemy - Don't Believe The Hype (1988)

                  The Rolling Stones – Rocks Off (1972)
                  The Rolling Stones – Rip This Joint (1972)
                  The Rolling Stones – Shake Your Hips (1972)

                  Aretha Franklin – Respect (1967)
                  Aretha Franklin – Drown In My Own Tears (1967)
                  Aretha Franklin - I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)

                  Michael Jackson - Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'
                  Michael Jackson - Baby Be Mine
                  Michael Jackson - The Girl Is Mine (ft. Paul McCartney)


                  Public Enemy - Don't Believe The Hype (1988)

                  Some leftover Public Enemy from my last playlist. A hypnotic looping backing track in a slow 4, with an occasional squeal sound on the ‘&’ of 3.

                  This is the second single to be released from their second album, It Takes a Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back, where it’s the third track.

                  I cannot help but think of Homer Simpson yelling “Doh!”, every time these guys yell “Don’t”.

                  Lyrically it’s a song about themselves, as well as a laundry list of political issues. I chuckle when they give a comparative shout-out to Coltrane, as if there were really some sort of real connection between he and them.

                  The Wikipedia entry lists the genre for this track as “Political Hip Hop”, as if to underscore my lack of understanding of urban musical genres. This sounds way more like Rap to me.

                  This is a good time to mention that it’s a rather usual thing for songs to have a multitude of songwriting credits, and several samples. For Don’t Believe the Hype the credits look like this:

                  Carlton “Chuck D” Ridenhour, Eric “Vietnam” Sadler, Hank Shocklee, and William “Flavor Flav” Drayton. (Chuck D and Flavor Flav are the two founding members Public Enemy.)

                  And it “Contains Samples of”:

                  Synthetic Substitution by Melvin Bless
                  Escape-ism and I Got Ants In My Pants by James Brown
                  Silly Rabbit, Trix Are for Kids by The Trix Rabbit and The Trix Kids
                  Fugitive by Whodini
                  Catch a Groove by Juice
                  Do the Funky Penguin (Live) by Rufus Thomas

                  And, you know, using samples is part of the art form of Rap and Hip Hop, and while some may consider this a lack of creativity, it actually shows a great deal of it. The clever uses of all these older songs is, in some ways, quite a tribute to the artists that have been sampled.

                  These samples can be a single sound, or a guitar lick, a vocal blip, or anything else that could conceivably be recognized as being from another artist’s work, but they’re often altered. For instance, I’m not sure what they’re even using from James Brown’s I Got Ants In My Pants, although it could be the bass and guitar slowed down. But they give credit to the artists anyway, and that’s fine.

                  I’m impressed with how often James Brown gets sampled on the album. Yeah, James Brown, the Godfather of Soul.




                  The Rolling Stones – Rocks Off (1972)

                  OK, again, I was never really a fan of The Stones, but there’s no question that they were popular, influential, and a kickbutt live band.

                  Here’s the first three tracks off their 1972 double-LP Exile On Main Street.

                  Critic Jason Ankeny claims that Rocks Off "perfectly sets the mood for what's to follow – murky, gritty, and menacingly raw, its strung-out incoherence captures the record's debauched brilliance with marble-mouthed eloquence.”

                  Some critics weren’t all that kind to the album when it was released, but nowadays it’s viewed by many critics as the Rolling Stones' best work. The album displays a rather surprising diversity of straight-ahead rock and roll, probably due to its incorporation of blues, rockabilly, honky-tonk, country, and 50s rock styles, mostly played in a more modern style for the time.

                  The infamous producer Allen Klein (from ABKCO) sued the Stones for breech of settlement, and collects royalties for five of the songs on the album.



                  The Rolling Stones – Rip This Joint (1972)

                  A frenetic rockabilly number that foreshadows some of the Punk movement years later.

                  This also features Nicky Hopkins on keys, and Bobby Keys on sax.



                  The Rolling Stones – Shake Your Hips (1972)

                  A standard 50s-sounding Blues rocker, written by Slim Harpo, a blues musician from Louisiana that sang, wrote songs, played guitar, and was considered a master harmonica player.



                  Aretha Franklin – Respect (1967)

                  Aretha Franklin’s1967 album I Never Loved a Man the Way I Love You, her tenth,also received mixed reviews when it was released, but is now consideredone of the greatest and most influential albums of all time.

                  Here’s the first three tracks from that groundbreaking album.

                  Of course, the opening track, Respect, Hit number One on the charts and became a signature song for her. It also helped make the album a breakthrough for her.

                  The song itself is actually a cover from Otis Redding’s 1965 album Otis Blue/Otis Sings Soul, and, although Redding has credit for writing the song, he merely re-wrote a song brought to him by Speedo Sims, who probably didn’t write it either.


                  Comment


                    10-Song Playlist for a Monday Afternoon, Part 2 of 2

                    Public Enemy - Don't Believe The Hype (1988)

                    The Rolling Stones – Rocks Off (1972)
                    The Rolling Stones – Rip This Joint (1972)
                    The Rolling Stones – Shake Your Hips (1972)

                    Aretha Franklin – Respect (1967)
                    Aretha Franklin – Drown In My Own Tears (1967)
                    Aretha Franklin - I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)

                    Michael Jackson - Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'
                    Michael Jackson - Baby Be Mine
                    Michael Jackson - The Girl Is Mine (ft. Paul McCartney)


                    Aretha Franklin – Drown In My Own Tears (1967)

                    This Henry Glover song is probably best known for a version released by Ray Charles in 1956, although it was first recorded by Lula Reed in 1951, reaching Number Five on the US Billboard R&B Chart.



                    Aretha Franklin - I Never Loved A Man (The Way I Love You)

                    Surprisingly, this powerful blues wailer was Franklin’s first big hit, prior to being overshadowed by Respect, when it was also released as a single. She’s also playing piano on the track

                    The album was her first for Atlantic Records, after releasing nine albums for Columbia. I Never Loved a Man was the third (and title) track on the album. The song reached Number One on the R&B charts, and Number Nine on the Billboard Hot 100.



                    Michael Jackson - Wanna Be Startin' Somethin'

                    The first three tracks from Jackson’s 1982 album, Thriller, a number One album in the US and the UK.

                    While the title track, Beat It, and Billie Jean were the runaway hits from the album, Jackson succeeded in making an album where practically every song is a killer. Thriller is THE BEST SELLING ALBUM OF ALL TIME. Still.

                    Seven songs from the album were released as singles, all reaching the Top Ten, including Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’, the fourth single released from the album, giving Jackson his fourth Top Ten Hit in a row.

                    Oddly enough, Jackson’s song was originally recorded, and unused, for his 1978 Off the Wall album, but re-recorded in 1982.

                    The song was the subject of a copyright lawsuit in 2009, after singer Rihanna sampled part of the song for her 2007 Hit single Don’t Stop the Music. As it turns out, Jackson had “borrowed” a line (the "mama-say mama-sa mama-coo-sa" hook) from Cameroonian musician Manu Dibango 1972 single Soul Mikasso.



                    Michael Jackson - Baby Be Mine

                    Second track from Thriller. This is as good a time as any to mention the contribution of Quincy Jones to Jackson’s music. He was likely as important to Jackson’s success as George Martin was to the Beatles’.



                    Michael Jackson - The Girl Is Mine (ft. Paul McCartney)

                    Surprisingly, this duet was the first single released from the album. The song was a hit despite some rather harsh criticism, labeling the song sappy, schmaltzy, silly, goofy, lacking substance, and attempt to pander to a white pop audience. This song would be the third collaboration between the two.

                    The Girl Is Mine is somewhat of an anomaly on this album; sure, it’s a smooth jazz/funk track, much like the previous track, although even smoother and far more laid back. But given the other tracks on the album, this track seems almost out of place. Then again, it’s a nice calm cup of tea in an elevator. And it’s a lovely pop song, with two stellar vocalists singing some of their sweetest croonings ever.

                    Listen for the impossibly low note Paul McCartney hits at 2:43.


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                      Ella Fitzgerald - Platinum Collection (2017).

                      CD3, before bedtime, while I read some Hans Christian Andersen stories (Penguin Classics edition 2003)
                      Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                      Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                      Comment


                        J. S. Bach - The Art of Fugue Angela Hewitt, piano.

                        I bought this during the interval of a concert in Nottingham in 2019, at which Canadian pianist Angela Hewitt was the soloist in Beethoven's Piano Concerto No.4. She was signing stuff in the foyer. Second time I've had a chance to meet her. Lovely lady.
                        Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                        Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                        Comment


                          Grateful Dead - American Beauty (1970)
                          50th Anniversary Edition 2020
                          💀⚡🌹🐢🐻❤️
                          Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                          Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                          Comment


                            Elbow - Flying Dream 1 (2021)

                            Barely spun this since buying it on release. It just popped into my head when I woke up this morning, so I'm spinning it now.
                            Beautiful and evocative song-writing.

                            I had one more go last night at resuscitating my CD player but it stubbornly refused to read any discs. Consequently I've unplugged it from the amplifier life-support and plugged in my BluRay player in its place. All sounds very fine. Probably a better machine than the CD player anyway.
                            I'll get a new CD player but it won't be till October at the earliest, as I'm still stabilising my finances after starting my new job at the end of May. Nine months of unemployment have left me fiscally unbalanced.
                            Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                            Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                            Comment


                              And on to....

                              Fairport Convention - Who Knows Where the Time Goes? (2017)

                              3CD compilation set.

                              ​​​​​​It's Fairport Convention's Cropredy Festival this weekend in Cambridgeshire, where not only Fairport have convened with various surviving alumni, but also Steve Hackett, and Mr and Mrs FrippCox are performing ...
                              Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                              Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                              Comment


                                Richard Thompson - Mock Tudor (1999)

                                Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                                Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

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