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    #16
    Originally posted by Susanne View Post
    I'd be potentially quite interested in the involvement of an external lyricist (depending on what they write, of course!) While not necessarily wishing to go backwards, I do miss the vagueness, or lack of precision in wording, in some of the earlier tracks. I would quite like to enjoy that kind of approach again, which draws me into the experience of a song more, if someone were to do it well.
    There are lyrics that offer you, the listener, more room for interpretation and exploration, and there are those that, uh, don't… Even to get back to our example of "A Living Island", you can look at lines such as "A living coral island where we can start again" juxtaposed with "Is this a paradise or a prison", and you can kind of wrestle with that, but once you hit "Here's to the frontline saviors/And the every day heroes unseen", well, that's pretty on the nose… And in my experience, it's not necessarily about vagueness, but less on the nose-ness will give words a longer lifespan. Anderson could be pretty out there, but when it works, he's got an image painted quite vividly that you may not know what the heck he thinks he means, but that gives you more room to be an active listener and interpreter. Or put another way, to quote The Professor, "The spaces in between /Leave room /For you and I to grow".

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      #17
      Originally posted by Homemade Parachute View Post

      "Here's to the frontline saviors/And the every day heroes unseen", well, that's pretty on the nose…

      .
      How dare Juano pay tribute to people who served their communities in the most serious civil crisis since WW2? The song moves from individual reactions of lockdown to a song of universal gratitude. How dare he use direct language. Saviors. Heroes. This time wasn't just an event that affected a few. It affected the whole world. All continents. To mark this time with direct and non vague language seems to me very necessary. No "angels" were magically involved but thousands of flesh and blood people like you and I that demonstrated real love for their fellow citizens.

      Why can't nurses, doctors, and scientists not be celebrated in song? Personally, I regard this song, musically and lyrically to be one of the most powerful Yesssongs ever recorded. Because the subject matters.

      We Will Remember

      F O R E V E R M O R E
      Last edited by Gilly Goodness; 06-21-2022, 12:59 PM.

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post
        Controversial Proposition:

        Should the boys consider making use of an external lyricist on a future album of new material?

        It worked well for King Crimson (Peter Sinfield & Richard Palmer-James), Procul Harum (Keith Reid) & the Grateful Dead (Robert Hunter & John Perry Barlow).

        I've listened to The Quest several times this week, which is more than I have up to this year so far, and what struck me is none of the present participants would know a good song lyric if it bit them on the nose.
        There IS a nice driving experience to be had listening to THE QUEST. I do enjoy it, esp in the car.

        I was listening today to TQ on my lunch commute, and it kind of hit me during track 2...

        "THE HOOK".

        Where's "The Hook" in these songs?

        Well played, yes. Enjoyable, yes. Well sung, yes.

        And yet... I really have a hard time "REMEMBERING" the songs on this album. And again - I DO "enjoy" the album very much. But it's so "different" in that everytime I do pull out the CD and scan the titles - I can't really remember the songs! LOL
        THE POINT: I "DO" think outside writers could help. Whether "South Side Of The Sky" in the 70s, "Shoot High Aim Low" in the 80s, or "I Would Have Waited Forever" in the 90s, the band had a LOT of A- incredible musicianship, with B- MEMORABLE hooks and melodies.

        (I think "Future Memories" takes a step in the right direction, a decent lyric and melody that gives me some hope with Juano writing at least...)


        -Douglas


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          #19
          Originally posted by agentarmstrong View Post
          THE POINT: I "DO" think outside writers could help.
          While I knew it was very unlikely to happen, I had hoped that what turned out to be The Quest would be full of co-writing with people outside the band who liked Yes music. Unfortunately, only the best and most dynamic song - with a hook! - was written by an outsider.

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by yamishogun View Post

            While I knew it was very unlikely to happen, I had hoped that what turned out to be The Quest would be full of co-writing with people outside the band who liked Yes music. Unfortunately, only the best and most dynamic song - with a hook! - was written by an outsider.
            Would not mind Chris Braide have some future input. Hooks and melodies are kinda his thing. Good lyricist too. Plus he plays guitar and keyboards. Can drum a bit too. Seems a nice chap. Young family. Lots of fascinatin'
            contacts. Well spoken and knowledgable.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by agentarmstrong View Post

              There IS a nice driving experience to be had listening to THE QUEST. I do enjoy it, esp in the car.

              I was listening today to TQ on my lunch commute, and it kind of hit me during track 2...

              "THE HOOK".

              Where's "The Hook" in these songs?

              Well played, yes. Enjoyable, yes. Well sung, yes.

              And yet... I really have a hard time "REMEMBERING" the songs on this album. And again - I DO "enjoy" the album very much. But it's so "different" in that everytime I do pull out the CD and scan the titles - I can't really remember the songs! LOL
              THE POINT: I "DO" think outside writers could help. Whether "South Side Of The Sky" in the 70s, "Shoot High Aim Low" in the 80s, or "I Would Have Waited Forever" in the 90s, the band had a LOT of A- incredible musicianship, with B- MEMORABLE hooks and melodies.

              (I think "Future Memories" takes a step in the right direction, a decent lyric and melody that gives me some hope with Juano writing at least...)


              -Douglas

              Isn't different what we as progressive rock fans, want?😉

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Homemade Parachute View Post

                There are lyrics that offer you, the listener, more room for interpretation and exploration, and there are those that, uh, don't… Even to get back to our example of "A Living Island", you can look at lines such as "A living coral island where we can start again" juxtaposed with "Is this a paradise or a prison", and you can kind of wrestle with that, but once you hit "Here's to the frontline saviors/And the every day heroes unseen", well, that's pretty on the nose… And in my experience, it's not necessarily about vagueness, but less on the nose-ness will give words a longer lifespan. Anderson could be pretty out there, but when it works, he's got an image painted quite vividly that you may not know what the heck he thinks he means, but that gives you more room to be an active listener and interpreter. Or put another way, to quote The Professor, "The spaces in between /Leave room /For you and I to grow".
                Gates of Delirium is my favourite Yes song. I would say its lyrics are pretty on the nose. It's the story of war and peace. Yet, it is its pretty on the nose being that make those lyrics really hit me each and every time I hear the song.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post
                  Controversial Proposition:

                  Should the boys consider making use of an external lyricist on a future album of new material?

                  It worked well for King Crimson (Peter Sinfield & Richard Palmer-James), Procul Harum (Keith Reid) & the Grateful Dead (Robert Hunter & John Perry Barlow).

                  I've listened to The Quest several times this week, which is more than I have up to this year so far, and what struck me is none of the present participants would know a good song lyric if it bit them on the nose.
                  I'm going to put something blasphemous out here 😉:

                  For me the vocals in Yesmusic are first and foremost one of the five instruments in the band, in the music. They represent the melody and often harmony in the music.

                  It took me years and years before I actually started paying attention to the actual words/lyrics of the songs. And while I'm a pretty spiritual and philosophical person, even if I do say so myself, in general the more direct lyrics in Yesmusic speak much more to me on an emotional level than the more abstract ones.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by RedSonja View Post
                    Time to retire “Yes”, and call it a day (a wonderfully long and great day) after this 50th CTTE tour. There is no sense carrying on like this.
                    For you that might be. It seems that those attending the current tour are in large part very enthusiastic about the shows. That's at least what a lot of the reactions on social media like twitter tell me. So for plenty of people there is most certainly sense in carrying on like this.
                    Last edited by Mr. Holland; 06-22-2022, 12:10 AM.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      I've had a thought!

                      You know the track on Alan's solo album, Spring: Song of Innocence? Well, how about they do that one live as a tribute to Alan? It has lyrics by William Blake, from Blake's illuminated book of poetry Songs of Innocence and Experience.
                      Heck (as Danny would say...) they could do a whole album of musical settings of William Blake poems from Innocence and Experience. A number of composers (Britten, Vaughan Williams) have set some of them to music before so they're very singable, and all quite short. The more I think of that, the more viable it sounds....
                      Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                      Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                        Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          You know I read some Khalil Gibran poetry today.

                          Could see that bein' put to music.

                          Dude had a way with imagery.

                          Bet some prog band has already done it. 😮

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post
                            I've had a thought!

                            You know the track on Alan's solo album, Spring: Song of Innocence? Well, how about they do that one live as a tribute to Alan? It has lyrics by William Blake, from Blake's illuminated book of poetry Songs of Innocence and Experience.
                            Heck (as Danny would say...) they could do a whole album of musical settings of William Blake poems from Innocence and Experience. A number of composers (Britten, Vaughan Williams) have set some of them to music before so they're very singable, and all quite short. The more I think of that, the more viable it sounds....
                            That tribute is a good idea. The mellow, dreamy mood fits the current incarnation perfectly. Plus, on a personal note, on my list of solo songs that deserve a Yes version, this one’s very high.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Gilly Goodness View Post
                              You know I read some Khalil Gibran poetry today.

                              Could see that bein' put to music.

                              Dude had a way with imagery.

                              Bet some prog band has already done it. 😮
                              Gibran was a great admirer of Blake.
                              Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                              Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Just googled. Tony Levin plays bass on a Richard Harris album of the Prophet. There are others. Probly a well tilled field.

                                So OP. The sage . What do you think of usin' Gibran. May also be in the Public Domain?

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