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Q: Steve Howe has no "guitar heir"...Is Yes "done" after Steve's done?

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    #16
    Originally posted by Oldie on the Goldie View Post
    Just an aside: I read that Phil Collins had arranged with Jon Anderson to audition as the drummer for Yes, but Collins chickened out at the last minute thinking he wasn't good enough (actually he was an excellent drummer - much better at that than at singing). Interesting to ponder how things might've turned out if he'd gone through with it and got the job.
    Just as an aside to your aside: Yes, Phil was a phenomenal drummer and a better drummer than a singer, but much better? I thought Collins was a great singer. I actually prefer live versions with him singing Gabriel era songs to their original counterpoints.

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      #17
      Originally posted by Somis Sound View Post
      Jimmy Haun is incredible, AND can handle the Rabin stuff better than Howe. I just hope it is not called "Yes".
      Yes, I'm in that place as well.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Ceasar’s Palace View Post
        It’s strange to remember that the Drama line up had only one original member. And yet, arguably, it turned out to be a completely viable, “alternative” Yes.
        True. But aside from the original member, it had two members that had been there for 7-9 years: White and Howe. Now I realise one can say the same for Downes , Davison and Sherwood, but the difference is the number of albums they have under their belt, and the both critical and commercial succes of those albums and how they contributed to the longlivety of Yes.

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          #19
          Originally posted by Mr. Holland View Post

          Just as an aside to your aside: Yes, Phil was a phenomenal drummer and a better drummer than a singer, but much better? I thought Collins was a great singer. I actually prefer live versions with him singing Gabriel era songs to their original counterpoints.
          Maybe you're right, I just happen to sometimes find his voice annoying - probably due to hearing it incessantly on the radio in the 1980s singing pop songs.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Oldie on the Goldie View Post

            Maybe you're right, I just happen to sometimes find his voice annoying - probably due to hearing it incessantly on the radio in the 1980s singing pop songs.
            Yes, there was no escaping Phil in the eighties. It's the decade I grew up in, certainly musically. I'm probably in the minority on this particular forum but I quite like Collins' solo material.

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              #21
              Started buyin' Genesis albums with ATTW3 without hearin' much that came before. Should remedy that. Fave album is TOTT. So I prefer that period. Find Gabriel's voice a tad harsh though that suits his later funky solo work. Phil is just so musical, rhythmic genius and emotionally available or should say confessional. But yeah. He was too everywhere. Buster. Miami Vice. Live Aid. Solo hits. His autobiography is a sad read. He worked himself to death. To alcoholism.

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                #22
                Originally posted by Somis Sound View Post
                Jimmy Haun is incredible, AND can handle the Rabin stuff better than Howe.
                Agreed.

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                  #23
                  I am hoping Yes stays around as long as possible. My only caveats are that the band should continue to make new studio albums with all-new Yes music (Ideally frequently), and in so doing give back to the Yes legacy that it will draw from for classic hits to play in concer, and that the band have some continuity of membership (i.e. At least one band member on the previous album should always be on the next one).

                  With all the turnover this band has seen over the years, I think it's obvious that it's more than the sun of it's parts and not limited to being about one specific individual, or several specific individuals. People said the band wouldn't last when Anderson left, it did (Twice). They said the same thing when Squire died, and here we sit right years later. Alan White's passing is very sad, but they played without him in Glasgow tonight and have been mostly playing with only limited participation from him for years.

                  When Steve retires, it won't be the first time he's left the band, and if the band continues without him, it won't be the first time he wasn't the lead guitarist of record (Peter Banks, Trevor Rabin).

                  I don't know if things will unfold as I hope they will. I could certainly see some unfortunate potential scenarios like the older stakeholders preventing the younger members from continuing as Yes, which would sadden me. I hope they let them continue as Yes and that that Yes continues to create and release new Yes music.
                  Last edited by downbyariver; 06-16-2022, 01:00 AM.
                  "A lot of the heavier conversations I was having with Chris toward the end were about his desire for this thing to go forward. He kept reiterating that to me. [...] He kept telling me, 'No matter what happens, Yes needs to continue moving forward and make great music. So promise me that that's something you want to do.'. And I have to keep making music. It's just what I do. [...] I'm a fan of the band and I want to see it thrive and that means new music." -Billy Sherwood

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                    #24
                    'Steve has no guitar hair'....
                    Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                    Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by downbyariver View Post
                      I am hoping Yes stays around as long as possible. My only caveats are that the band should continue to make new studio albums with all-new Yes music (Ideally frequently), and in so doing give back to the Yes legacy that it will draw from for classic hits to play in concer, and that the band have some continuity of membership (i.e. At least one band member on the previous album should always be on the next one).

                      With all the turnover this band has seen over the years, I think it's obvious that it's more than the sun of it's parts and not limited to being about one specific individual, or several specific individuals. People said the band wouldn't last when Anderson left, it did (Twice). They said the same thing when Squire died, and here we sit right years later. Alan White's passing is very sad, but they played without him in Glasgow tonight and have been mostly playing with only limited participation from him for years.

                      When Steve retires, it won't be the first time he's left the band, and if the band continues without him, it won't be the first time he wasn't the lead guitarist of record (Peter Banks, Trevor Rabin).

                      I don't know if things will unfold as I hope they will. I could certainly see some unfortunate potential scenarios like the older stakeholders preventing the younger members from continuing as Yes, which would sadden me. I hope they let them continue as Yes and that that Yes continues to create and release new Yes music.
                      Here's where I find fault with your all the turnover this band has seen over the years, I think it's obvious that it's more than the sum of its parts and not limited to being about one specific individual, or several specific individuals theory; it makes it sound like all individuals or combination of individuals have had the same impact, as if all is equal. And that's just very far from the truth.

                      The individuals or combination of individuals that created Heaven & Earth or The Quest has had a lot less impact on the both creative and commercial succes, and the longlivety of Yes as a band, than those that created Fragile, Close to the Edge, Relayer, Going for the One and 90125 for that matter. So the giving back to the legacy by a new(er) line up is less than the drawing from and it seems that the in-balance in that is becoming bigger with each classic member that either leaves or passes away IMO. I mean it's not like Yes is attracting whole masses of new fans with each new album they make, with those fans coming to concerts especially to hear all this new music.

                      99% of Yes fans have been there for a long long time and those still continuing the ride foremost seem to do so out of a certain loyaty to the band and to the legacy of its music created in its heydays.

                      So certain individuals and certain combinations of individuals are way, way more important, if not to say vital, to the legacy than others and when none of those vital individuals are there, for most fans the reason for calling it Yes will cease to be. You can change one of the basic/key ingredients for a pizza (you have cauliflower crust now instead of bread for people who are allergic to gluten), but if you change them all, it really is no longer a pizza, also not if you change them one by one over many years.
                      Last edited by Mr. Holland; 06-16-2022, 01:33 AM.

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                        #26
                        You can’t blame us Yesfans for looking over the horizon (in true Alan White spirit) all the time. I do it too. But then I force myself to look only at the next album.
                        May the upward trend continue.

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by Mr. Holland View Post

                          Just as an aside to your aside: Yes, Phil was a phenomenal drummer and a better drummer than a singer, but much better? I thought Collins was a great singer. I actually prefer live versions with him singing Gabriel era songs to their original counterpoints.
                          100 percent agree.

                          Comment


                            #28
                            I have to say - not that my opinion is worth very much - but i hope they call it a day. i dont think they owe us anything. Yes has had a fluctuating line up no question but when there are none of the major players from the key periods of the bands history left, what do you really have? How would ELP be received if Carl went out on the road with a guy called Bert Enfield and Alfie Low? far more credible for Jon D and the rest to launch a new band and leave the tribute bands to do what they do, and more and more often, very well indeed.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by Mr. Holland View Post

                              Here's where I find fault with your all the turnover this band has seen over the years, I think it's obvious that it's more than the sum of its parts and not limited to being about one specific individual, or several specific individuals theory; it makes it sound like all individuals or combination of individuals have had the same impact, as if all is equal. And that's just very far from the truth.

                              The individuals or combination of individuals that created Heaven & Earth or The Quest has had a lot less impact on the both creative and commercial succes, and the longlivety of Yes as a band, than those that created Fragile, Close to the Edge, Relayer, Going for the One and 90125 for that matter. So the giving back to the legacy by a new(er) line up is less than the drawing from and it seems that the in-balance in that is becoming bigger with each classic member that either leaves or passes away IMO. I mean it's not like Yes is attracting whole masses of new fans with each new album they make, with those fans coming to concerts especially to hear all this new music.

                              99% of Yes fans have been there for a long long time and those still continuing the ride foremost seem to do so out of a certain loyaty to the band and to the legacy of its music created in its heydays.

                              So certain individuals and certain combinations of individuals are way, way more important, if not to say vital, to the legacy than others and when none of those vital individuals are there, for most fans the reason for calling it Yes will cease to be. You can change one of the basic/key ingredients for a pizza (you have cauliflower crust now instead of bread for people who are allergic to gluten), but if you change them all, it really is no longer a pizza, also not if you change them one by one over many years.
                              Well said!

                              Comment


                                #30
                                If Steve goes for whatever reason, I foresee Jon Anderson coming back. As for Steve's successor, he hasn't worked too closely with another guitarist in terms of taking someone under his wing like Squire/Sherwood. He's precious with his role as guitarist and collaborations with other guitarists are usually competitive (GTR for example - both guitarists had their own developed sound independent from each other). Howe is probably not too interested in 'passing the torch' to another guitarist, even if he gives Yes his blessing to continue. He may even view Yes unworthy to continue past his involvement and view himself as the only valid guitarist for Yes.

                                Here's one thought: Steve retires but folds Yes, forbidding it to continue without him. Arc Of Life, with a core of current Yes alumni - once a spin-off Sherwood project and now without the flagship band to compete with - starts to develop more traditional Yes-like material, becoming Yes without the brand name.

                                I'm ok with that. Never been too lineup specific, so a 21st century Yes with no original members or members on any classic 70's album is ok by me as long as it feels like Yes. Of course they'll never play the live stuff quite like the 70's members did, so they will be viewed by some as a watered-down Yes, They can't compete with their past. So matching what they did in the 70's or any other era is unlikely. But new pastures - that's my dream scenario. Now is the time to pump out new albums as if there were no old albums to go by. I'm all in for new albums, with Howe or not.

                                I'd go for Jimmy Haun for successor, but that's not someone who Howe would choose and I'm sure he doesn't want a successor. To answer the question, I'm not sure if Yes would be done after Howe. I hope it would continue fifty years from now with new generations coming and going and keeping the 'brand' alive. Like a sports team. Nobody from the original Baltimore Orioles is alive playing baseball. Or any team of any sport. But the brand goes on. Walt Disney is long gone, but the films keep coming. As long as certain principles are upheld (and that's a sketchy thing to define, much less agree on) the brand Yes may go on without any member there from its 1970's-1991 heyday.

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