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ARW what do you believe they did?

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  • Olorin
    replied
    I also felt there was more excitement for ARW but that may be just an impression. The first time I saw them was at the Chicago Theatre, which has 3 times the capacity of most of the places I've seen YesO in recent years, and with more people comes more audience reaction. The second time was at Ravinia, which is Chicago's fabled grandfather of the summer sheds, having been built early in the last century. There's always a festive atmosphere there, as unlike with most summer sheds, it's a very classy operation, with large shade trees on the lawn, statues to look at, LED candelabras to rent to have on your little table on the lawn (not making that up!), etc.

    On the other hand, whatever excitement I perceived for the two ARW shows was totally dwarfed by the excitement at the YesO Fragile/CTTE 2-album show. It felt like the Beatles had risen from the grave, the crowd was so crazy for the band. The band really took notice and at the end Howe shouted out, You guys are a fantastic audience!

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  • tumnus
    replied
    Originally posted by Kenny View Post

    It's hard to believe the criticism, often bordering on hate, aimed at ARW on forums by supposed Yes fans. New music would, of course, have been a bonus but I love every minute of the concerts. Such wonderful memories from Yes legends!
    at the risk of stirring all this up again, which i dont want, and coming from someone who enjoyed both bands, it seemed the majority of vitriol was the other way around. look on any yes related feed and you were swamped with "no jon no yes" stuff and "this is the real yes", and the band's management (cough brian lane) was really heavily pushing that angle, fairly aggressively.

    the vitriol from the YesO type people was more in response to that sort of thing and the marketing rather than initially. most people (nearly all if you think about it) on here are pretty serious fans of jon anderson and rick wakeman too and were pleased to see them playing. It was trying to negate an already working band and lineup that was the issue.

    (and as steve said, the line up worked, it did the work - gigs and tours, and now records. OK it might not be as stellar as you'd like, but they could do it. ARW proved they couldnt actually do it beyond the initial reunion tour buzz - which I am sad about)

    BUT DONT GET ME WRONG! it could easily turn into "he said she said" stuff, and "im rubber your glue", but that was my honest viewpoint. It might not be yours if say you put something about ARW and got cussed down for it, etc.

    these days i'm happy i got to see both those groups of fellows, and I would be happy to see any combination of any of them in the future. And in particular Jon.

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  • Mr. Holland
    replied
    Originally posted by Kenny View Post


    There was a real buzz at the 35th Anniversary shows too. At Wembley, I met a couple of friends that I didn't know were Yes fans. One is now a Member of the House of Lords and a Government Minister.

    There were fans who had travelled to the UK from all over Europe to see ARW. The atmosphere was electric with excitement and anticipation. Many had thought that, after his illnesses, Jon would not be able to do a Yes tour so it was a very emotional experience. We were amazed that Jon's could sing a full two hour set with such energy. Trevor and Rick were really up for it too. Starship Trooper was fantastic.

    It's hard to believe the criticism, often bordering on hate, aimed at ARW on forums by supposed Yes fans. New music would, of course, have been a bonus but I love every minute of the concerts. Such wonderful memories from Yes legends!
    Starship Trooper was only played on the opening night of the first ARW tour at the Hardrock cafe in Orlando, Florida.

    The concert I saw here in the Netherlands was great. Loved every minute of it. It was joy to hear and see Jon in such good shape.

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  • Kenny
    replied
    Originally posted by Davy View Post
    Maybe I was just imagining it, but there was a buzz at the ARW show unlike any I'd experienced since the ABWH tours, a tantalizing promise of what-if. Much as I love the official band, that night there was the sense that it you were a Yes fan, that was the place to be.

    I'm not disappointed that they didn't record a new album. But I wish they had toured for another year, shaken up the set list a bit, and maybe definitively announced their farewell once and for all.

    There was a real buzz at the 35th Anniversary shows too. At Wembley, I met a couple of friends that I didn't know were Yes fans. One is now a Member of the House of Lords and a Government Minister.

    There were fans who had travelled to the UK from all over Europe to see ARW. The atmosphere was electric with excitement and anticipation. Many had thought that, after his illnesses, Jon would not be able to do a Yes tour so it was a very emotional experience. We were amazed that Jon's could sing a full two hour set with such energy. Trevor and Rick were really up for it too. Starship Trooper was fantastic.

    It's hard to believe the criticism, often bordering on hate, aimed at ARW on forums by supposed Yes fans. New music would, of course, have been a bonus but I love every minute of the concerts. Such wonderful memories from Yes legends!
    Last edited by Kenny; 09-28-2022, 07:37 AM.

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  • tumnus
    replied
    Originally posted by Davy View Post
    Maybe I was just imagining it, but there was a buzz at the ARW show unlike any I'd experienced since the ABWH tours, a tantalizing promise of what-if. Much as I love the official band, that night there was the sense that it you were a Yes fan, that was the place to be.
    Not at all, I'd agree with you there, I felt a real buzz too. People talking to each other before the show, etc, strangers which is unheard of in britain. I bumped into Pete Trewavas of marillion at the bar, who was getting a pint for himself and Ian Mosley who had come to the show (tried not to make an ass of myself, they were just out to have a night off and enjoy themselves)

    I've got to mention the set design by liquid len was very good too... to me it gave the show a very clean, almost minimal look, it really worked to sell it was just these guys rather than mountains of equipment and a big production. This helped bring you into the show a bit more intimately I thought. (I really dont know if Rick had another keys player behind the stage, but i was impressed at the amount of texture he was adding rather than just soloing, if you get my drift)

    yeah, it was a good buzz, which is why I thought it didnt need that crowd sound dubbed on the DVD.. seriously, I would pay extra for a dvd with that removed. a lot extra!

    the best bit was I thought the music sounded different enough from the Yes 'official' that neither group was really treading on each other's toes musically. Even when doing the same songs. Marketting wise, it was a whole different ballgame of course, but musically I was very happy. YesO doing Owner and Rhythm of Love arent my favorite bits of their set (seems like lip service that people arent really there for in truth) even back in 1998, the audiences went crazy for heart of the sunrise instead!

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  • Davy
    replied
    Maybe I was just imagining it, but there was a buzz at the ARW show unlike any I'd experienced since the ABWH tours, a tantalizing promise of what-if. Much as I love the official band, that night there was the sense that it you were a Yes fan, that was the place to be.

    I'm not disappointed that they didn't record a new album. But I wish they had toured for another year, shaken up the set list a bit, and maybe definitively announced their farewell once and for all.

    Leave a comment:


  • JMKUSA
    replied
    A live album from the later dates with a slightly different setlist would be nice. I really like the one live album they put out. I’m glad ARW existed, and I’m glad they released that live album.

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  • Olorin
    replied
    Originally posted by tumnus View Post

    Edit: Sorry, i hadn't noticed the thread is a few months old. Early morning, long drive, coffee...
    Don't feel guilty about bumping a thread, or let anyone tell you it's necroposting. ;-)

    In any event, it looks like I had somehow never posted anything in this thread, and so this gave me the opportunity to have at it. And in getting back to the original question posed by the thread, what do I think ARW did? They gave us two really fun, nostalgia-drenched tours, perhaps the last time we'll ever hear the YesWest music played by someone who wrote it and really likes it. At the end of the day, I'm not sure we could've or should've expected more. Sure, Jon made lofty pronouncements that ARW would "reignite" Yes, but we all knew that wasn't very likely. He and Lane really oversold the whole venture, but I'm not going to hold that against them. What I got was good enough to offset any disappointment from not getting whatever I was slightly naive enough to think could remotely happen.

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  • tumnus
    replied
    Originally posted by Grey Wolf View Post

    That happens to be the way I feel about the current lineup. I do like The Quest, but it's nothing like what I used to get from Yes, even Fly From Here had some of it.
    me too, if i'm being really honest. But I still like it, and think the current incarnation is a really good working/touring unit. I wish them well, and hope they keep working. Saw them live in london in the summer and enjoyed it. It isn't the same, but what the hell is? lucky to be alive on earth at the same time (the size of the universe! and I get born on one that has rock music and Yes), and in a place where i could appreciate it

    Edit: Sorry, i hadn't noticed the thread is a few months old. Early morning, long drive, coffee...

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  • Grey Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Somis Sound View Post

    Interesting Arno, maybe you are right! However Yes is my favorite all around band. Steve is my favorite guitarist. Alan/Bill favorite drummers. Chris favorite bassist/harmony singer. Jon is one of my favorite lead singers. Rick/Pat/Geoff some of my favorite keyboard players... I just think when you don't have a majority of those folks creating or playing together, you have quite a diluted Yes. One that lacks some sort of magical nuance that I detect and can give me or my soul chills. And sure, they do play the old songs well enough... You do make some great points, and I think there is a lot of truth to it. After watching a ton of live Yes on youtube, I definitely miss Anderson, Squire, and Alan. What an incredible run... Again, I wish TQ made me feel the Yes feeling. I'm glad other fans think it's great!
    That happens to be the way I feel about the current lineup. I do like The Quest, but it's nothing like what I used to get from Yes, even Fly From Here had some of it.

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  • Somis Sound
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Holland View Post

    Perhaps, when it comes down to it, you are a Chris Squire fan first and foremost and a Yes fan, second? I don't mean that in any derogatory way. But if he was the most important, the key factor, in what attracts you in Yesmusic, then it's only logical that The Quest is not for you. For others that will be the case with No Anderson, and for others No Howe (as witnessesed by some fans not getting along with the Rabin era).

    For what it's worth, I can find something to like on The Quest, but I have no problem admitting it's all lightyears away from the main sequence and the Rabin era for me when it comes to how much I love the music. Part of that has probably something to do with the music itself, but no doubt that also comes into play that the main sequence and the Rabin era is sort of part of my musical DNA. Research show that between 12-18 years of age is when the most musical inprint happens. So as one gets older it becomes naturally harder to be as open and caring for new(er) music. Which is why I also reckon that with us longtime fans no new Yes album ever, no matter how good it actually is, will live up to what has come before.
    Interesting Arno, maybe you are right! However Yes is my favorite all around band. Steve is my favorite guitarist. Alan/Bill favorite drummers. Chris favorite bassist/harmony singer. Jon is one of my favorite lead singers. Rick/Pat/Geoff some of my favorite keyboard players... I just think when you don't have a majority of those folks creating or playing together, you have quite a diluted Yes. One that lacks some sort of magical nuance that I detect and can give me or my soul chills. And sure, they do play the old songs well enough... You do make some great points, and I think there is a lot of truth to it. After watching a ton of live Yes on youtube, I definitely miss Anderson, Squire, and Alan. What an incredible run... Again, I wish TQ made me feel the Yes feeling. I'm glad other fans think it's great!
    Last edited by Somis Sound; 08-25-2022, 01:19 PM.

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  • bondegezou
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Holland View Post
    Perhaps, when it comes down to it, you are a Chris Squire fan first and foremost and a Yes fan, second? I don't mean that in any derogatory way. But if he was the most important, the key factor, in what attracts you in Yesmusic, then it's only logical that The Quest is not for you. For others that will be the case with No Anderson, and for others No Howe (as witnessesed by some fans not getting along with the Rabin era).
    That seems a bit reductive.

    There's a lot of Yes music. It's no surprise that many Yes fans don't like all of it, whatever their reasons.

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  • Mr. Holland
    replied
    Originally posted by Somis Sound View Post

    LOL. Maybe it was Page who morphed him into a chameleon at that meeting he was the only one not to attend.

    And no Danny, The Ice Bridge left me cold with no goose bumps. It reminded me of recycled Yes past among recycled other things, without the authentic Squire bass and vocals. Such a huge magical nuance to be missing... And I didn't care for the vocals without Chris. I tried!..... I've loved at least something on every other album
    Perhaps, when it comes down to it, you are a Chris Squire fan first and foremost and a Yes fan, second? I don't mean that in any derogatory way. But if he was the most important, the key factor, in what attracts you in Yesmusic, then it's only logical that The Quest is not for you. For others that will be the case with No Anderson, and for others No Howe (as witnessesed by some fans not getting along with the Rabin era).

    For what it's worth, I can find something to like on The Quest, but I have no problem admitting it's all lightyears away from the main sequence and the Rabin era for me when it comes to how much I love the music. Part of that has probably something to do with the music itself, but no doubt that also comes into play that the main sequence and the Rabin era is sort of part of my musical DNA. Research show that between 12-18 years of age is when the most musical inprint happens. So as one gets older it becomes naturally harder to be as open and caring for new(er) music. Which is why I also reckon that with us longtime fans no new Yes album ever, no matter how good it actually is, will live up to what has come before.

    Leave a comment:


  • Somis Sound
    replied
    Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post

    I have an image in my head of JPJ on stage with Led Zep blending into the background while catching insects with his prehensile tongue...
    LOL. Maybe it was Page who morphed him into a chameleon at that meeting he was the only one not to attend.

    And no Danny, The Ice Bridge left me cold with no goose bumps. It reminded me of recycled Yes past among recycled other things, without the authentic Squire bass and vocals. Such a huge magical nuance to be missing... And I didn't care for the vocals without Chris. I tried!..... I've loved at least something on every other album

    Leave a comment:


  • The Whale
    replied
    Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post
    much as the Dead did in 1995 after Jerry died. I can't honestly say that my listening would be much the poorer for not having any of the albums after Magnification. It's nice for those who like them to have them, but I've got so much more in my listening that I prefer to Fly From Here, Heaven and Hell and The Quest, that not having them wouldn't matter to me. I got on the starship in 1973, seen plenty of shows between then and 2014, my last, that my cup has runneth over and made a mess on the floor, so I don't feel they need to keep going. It's up to them, well Steve really, but if they'd retired the band at some point in the last two decades, I'd have been content.
    The Dead isn't such a great comparison. Their life blood was touring not dropping albums. Both of which they kept doing even after Jerry's passing. The Strange Remain was weird. But Further Fest and Phil and Friends are still Dead and were quite good. The Boys and The Dead are such a unique thing. It isn't really fair to compare any "band" to them. They are more of a family. Making it an even stranger comparison even further is that Jerry didn't even want to be in the Dead he wanted to leave but the boys kept insisting the machine march on. Really very sad. Poor Jerry.

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