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Time and a Word- Rating out of 5?

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    Time and a Word- Rating out of 5?

    back to the original lineup- everydays a good one to listen to this album.
    23
    5
    4.35%
    1
    4
    34.78%
    8
    3
    47.83%
    11
    2
    13.04%
    3
    1
    0%
    0
    The Definitive YES Albums

    -The Yes Album-Fragile-Close to the Edge-Tales From Topographic Oceans-
    -Relayer-Going for the One-Drama-90125-Big Generator-Union-Talk-
    -The Ladder-Magnification-Fly From Here-The Quest-

    #2
    Let’s see. I listen to NONNEN, Astral Traveller, The Prophet and Clear Days.
    Oh, and Sweet Dreams, the single version.
    Chris is great on this album. And so is Tony. And Bill.
    Peter and Jon are ok.

    I know that Then is a great song, and I have a stupid reason for not liking it. It’s Anderson’s husky voice.
    I also know that the orchestration isn’t the best. I still like it.

    So that is 3 stars. I think.

    Comment


      #3
      3.


      Yeah a bit hit and miss. Clunky. Actually like Jon's early airy, husky voice. He even said once he wanted to song like Joe Cocker. Then, Astral T are great and should be done Live again.
      Syd Arthur have a similar vibe to the 2 early psycheadelic YES albums.

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        #4
        A 3 from me. Was the 1st step to many great albums

        Comment


          #5
          3

          Definitely a step down from the first album. The orchestrations seem just added on and songs nowhere near as strong as first outing

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Old Frothingslosh View Post
            3

            Definitely a step down from the first album. The orchestrations seem just added on and songs nowhere near as strong as first outing
            I share broadly the same outlook. Hindsight would suggest it’s the band floundering a bit after a pretty solid start. I perceive it as an aural expression of the group struggling, and to some degree failing, to find a direction. The material on their debut I find stronger and although I don’t hate the orchestration I think in this instance it’s a case of ‘more is less’.

            Comment


              #7
              Before there was Magnification, there was Time & A Word.

              The GOOD:

              Good solid songs, I like them. The original Yes was an Earthy, grinding and rocking ensemble. The music on Time A W isn't too unlike the debut, both of the first two albums generally feel like they're cut from the same cloth. They could come in a double-pack. They could have been a double album. The only difference is the orchestra. But on here, the same format as the debut - 8 songs, two of them covers.

              But here is some fine Yes music, and like on the first album, you can hear hints of later directions and ideas. But decent songs here - Astral Traveller is an instant contender for 'classic Yes', the organ and guitar interplay of Banks and Kaye are as vibrant as anything Howe and Wakeman would offer a few years forward. A couple of strong anthems in the title track and especially Sweet Dreams - one of the best tracks from the first Yes. Why was Sweet Dreams not a hit or something that stayed in the live setlist more often? Not just a good Yes song, just a good song in general. But the album's diamond gem here is The Prophet. Yeah, the canned strings get in the way a bit, but Tony Kaye's organ intro is very nice. I didn't even realize that this track 'borrowed' a bit from the Jupiter movement of Holst's The Planets suite at first. Only later did I do a 'hey, wait a minute...'. The Prophet is an overlooked early Yes classic that should get another look.

              The BAD:

              Well, I don't hate the orchestra by any means, It's generally ok with me, but it may have been too early in their existence to try for the 'symphonic rock' thing. Back in those days, symphony orchestra musicians often had an overall disdain for rock & roll, and viewed it as loud and obnoxious noise played by hairy orangutans - it was beneath them. So they may not have put their heart into it. Add to the fact that it was probably expensive and rather rushed, well, it may have been too soon to go the orchestral route. The slapped-on budget strings actually even diminished the sound quality of the album in spots, especially on 'Then'. Tony and especially Peter aren't exactly non-existent on Time A Word, but they share space with the rent-an-orchestra. And when Banks voiced his irritation, well, you're Yes fans, you know what happened next.

              That said, I'm still overall ok with the orchestra, they worked best perhaps on Clear Days - the album's Soft As A Dove moment. The discount quickie-strings really don't sound quite as flimsy and cheesy as on the first Genesis album. But listen to the Rhino bonus tracks like Everydays with just the band. That organ! We could have had that instead.

              The UGLY:

              Two albums in and Peter Banks is out, one member never to return in any future lineups or reunions. He was not too dissimilar to Steve Howe in some of his more jazzier and energetic moments. He could be beautifully melodic one moment and innovatively chaotic the next. There was a level of unpredictability and danger in his guitar playing that Yes didn't have again. Maybe they just didn't get along with him, personality clashes and etc. or he was hard to work with, I don't know. Maybe he was his own worse enemy or maybe Yes threw him under the bus - maybe a little of both. I liked his playing - be it Yes, Flash, Empire or solo. I wish there was more Peter Banks somewhere in the Yes story. Now he's gone and it's too late.

              Yes looks fondly on this album and half of the album is represented on Yesterdays as well as the T&AW B-side Dear Father. I'm actually surprised at least some material from Time And A Word wasn't performed on the Yessymphonic tour of 2001. I give it a 4, not perfect but still enjoyable. Faves include Sweet Dreams, The Prophet, and Astral Traveler. The title track was always better live with other lineups.

              Comment


                #8
                2

                Both points awarded for the title track, which I consider the first actual Yes song.

                Unless they unexpectedly put something into the live set I'm happy that I'll never have to hear the rest again.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by RelayerI View Post
                  2

                  Both points awarded for the title track, which I consider the first actual Yes song.

                  Unless they unexpectedly put something into the live set I'm happy that I'll never have to hear the rest again.
                  But...but... Astral Traveller... surely...

                  Comment


                    #10
                    ...maybe he doesn't like bein' in the ruins of the balloon? Someone flyin' high?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'm casting my mind back to early 1975 when Yesterdays came out, and there are four songs on it from Time and a Word, five if you include Dear Father. Just two from the first album. So out of eight tracks in total, five come from Time and a Word. That was my first hearing not only of the startling America jam, but of anything from those first two albums. Yesterdays was quite successful, which led to the first two albums appearing on the browsers again in record shops, which I acquired thereupon.

                      I remember putting Yesterdays on cassette so I could take it with me on holiday, to hear on my crappy little portable cassette player, in the summer of 1975 (Two weeks in Cliftonville, Kent, for our 9th consecutive year. I loved it there, I always had the best of times there. Cliftonville was to Margate what Hove was to Brighton). I had a second cassette, and a third, of the other albums then released.

                      The Time and a Word tracks struck chords with me much more so than the two from the debut album. Not sure why. Then, especially, did and still does: 'Hate is the root of cancer, love is the only answer'... Not a bad basis on which to begin each day.
                      Once I got the full album, those extrapolated tracks settled into their proper context within the album whole. My parents recognised the opening theme of No Opportunity Necessary, No Experience Needed, but that meant nothing to me. I liked the song. Everydays I found slightly spooky and very atmospheric. It's not actually that far away from the Buffalo Springfield original, but it has more air, more space, takes its time to get to where it's going. I've always liked that in music, that's it's not in a hurry to get to the next big riff or chorus; there's time to wander, and wonder. Sweet Dreams was a bouncier affair, and in the spring of 1975 I heard it half a dozen times tagged onto the end of Roundabout on the Relayer tour, and that bass sound! Upbeat and optimistic track, with a jazzy drop-in that I took to from the off.
                      The Prophet was and is irresistible for me: dramatic, wide-screen, thundering. Great intro from Tony, strong writing throughout, brilliant work from Bill. In fact, Bill's work on the whole album is outstanding, a big step-up in foregrounding percussion, highly inventive, surprising, innovative. Clear Days, rather like Yesterday and Today, is a lovesong, not something I'm madly keen on generally. It is what it is, nothing profound or reaching, nicely done, nothing more.
                      Astral Traveler is probably, alongside Then, the most 'out there' track on it, and for me a precursor to the likes of Yours is no Disgrace and Perpetual Change. Time and a Word, the title track, became close to a regular fixture on a few tours right up to the end of the 90s. The rounds out a few themes put forth on Then, and I think the song sits nicely next to that one.

                      The orchestra is fine. I've always enjoyed hearing an orchestra, and veteran arranger Tony Cox does a nice job. Brave move by the band to reach for a sound like that on only their second album, but I hear a band playing with confidence and assurance, being inventive and, dare I say, progressive. It was by no means unusual for rock bands emerging from the psychedelia of the late 60s to make use of orchestras. I'm all in favour of it
                      So, it has pleasing and nostalgic associations for me from my teenage years, I turned 16 in mid-75, but I like the album anyway, a lot. I like that it doesn't sound quite like any other of the albums of those early 70s years. I like the cover versions on it, Everydays especially, I like the orchestra sound, I like Chris's in-yer-face bass, Bill's percussion (that snare work!), Pete's choppy, rhythmic, jazz-tinged guitar, Tony's throbbing organ, and Jon's still-developing vocal powers, all coalescing into something full of promise and energy, invention and beauty.
                      ​​​​​​​Fucking good album!
                      I think I give Yesterdays a spin.

                      Sometimes the lights all shining on me, other times I can barely see.
                      Lately it occurs to me what a long strange trip it’s been.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post
                        In fact, Bill's work on the whole album is outstanding, a big step-up in foregrounding percussion, highly inventive, surprising, innovative.
                        Yes, just take the chorus of Astral Traveller. The way he’s spacing his fills with silences where you wouldn’t expect them almost like he would perfection much later with One More Red Nightmare.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Ceasar’s Palace View Post

                          But...but... Astral Traveller... surely...
                          Surely a steaming pile of garbage.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by RelayerI View Post

                            Surely a steaming pile of garbage.
                            You’ve got to be kidding.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              TAAW, pretty good.
                              Astral Traveller, very good,
                              Anyone else notice the guitar intro & outro was repurposed as the harp bit in Awaken?

                              Comment

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