Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

CTTE 50 Years Anniversary Boxset

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ash Armstrong
    replied
    As far as overall unit sales go, I suggest the water is now so muddied as to render the concept meaningless.
    Consider:
    Up to the early 1980s music was retailed on LPs, singles, and cassettes for the most part, which were purchased from a dedicated record shop, or within a larger retail space like a supermarket or department store. Fairly easy to keep a running total of sales of this or that record, and just as easy to falsify those totals, either at the retail-outlet level or further up the corporate chain, and that's discounting the sales from independent shops, and I doubt department stores and supermarkets kept up to the minute checks on how many of a particular record they sold. Why would they? Their criteria is turnover. One assumes they simply wrote off those that were shoplifted. I know from experience how easy it was to nick records from certain shops...
    Then along comes a brand new format at the start of the 1980s: CDs, so a lot of music fans make the format-switch over a period of time, and buy their favourite records all over again in the new format. And you also have to factor in those younger folks buying those albums for the first time anyway, never having bought them on vinyl. How do you differentiate from all the different retail outlets who is buying what? Another layer of guesstimation comes in to further skew the already skewed and wildly inaccurate sales figures.
    Ten years later, remastering becomes a thing, so people buy their favourite albums again for a third time! Plus younger folks buying the album on CD may have bought the vinyl-master CD in the 1980s, or other folks are buying it for the first time...
    You see how complex and incoherent this is all getting, and we haven't even reached the broadband era yet, with downloads across the board, and streaming from anywhere in the world, some of it unlicensed and illegal. No one is going to send in sales returns for them!
    Then we get remixes, and more remastered editions to offset the overly-loud mastering of the earlier ones, and then vinyl makes a comeback, both with online retailers, but crucially on the high streets, and independent shops spring up catering for the upsurge in the old format. New albums start to become available in multiple formats and different editions.

    What it comes down to is that sales figures, in any particular territory, region, nation, continent, for this or that album of the kind of vintage we're talking about here, half a century ago, are completely arbitrary and essentially meaningless, and mpossible to calculate in any viable way. There have been too many permutations, too many re-purchases, both by the same generation and by different generations over the last 50 years, for it to be possible to determine who sold what to who, how many times, in how many formats.
    Of course, one could opt for a belief-based adjudication on it, and I've a hunch much of what free-marketeers rely on is consumer-faith-based.

    It's not being asserted that something that has clearly sold shedloads of copies over the last 50 years is of less artistic 'value' than something more niche, though I'd certainly not hesitate in saying so about the flippin' Eagles, but that's just me. Maybe it's a North American thing to tie commercial performance with a qualitative view on artistic product, I dunno. Just saying....

    Leave a comment:


  • Soundchaser413
    replied
    Well, if it's a boxset then there will be a lot of stuff on it besides just the regular album. My guess would be a lot of live stuff. I don't think there are many (if any) rare songs that didn't make it to the album. I would have to look at the song list before deciding if it's something I want. If there is a dvd included that would probably make me want to get it though.

    Also, I don't think any version featuring Jon Davison would belong on it (Just my opinion though).

    Leave a comment:


  • John Vehadija
    replied
    Originally posted by PeterCologne View Post

    Sorry, but that would be a nightmare
    Ok, maybe an acoustic version

    Leave a comment:


  • PeterCologne
    replied
    Originally posted by John Vehadija View Post
    ...plus even re-record a new version in the studio, anyways, one can dream
    Sorry, but that would be a nightmare

    Leave a comment:


  • carlmarx38
    replied
    Originally posted by John Vehadija View Post
    They could release the original, plus some live versions throughout the years, plus even re-record a new version in the studio, anyways, one can dream

    We already got Seven different shows from the CTTE tour......I'd be much more interested in getting the complete show of NY/Academy of Music (Feb '72), from which LDR/The Fish on Yessongs was taken. As for a re-recording by the Jon Davison lineup......no comment !

    Leave a comment:


  • John Vehadija
    replied
    They could release the original, plus some live versions throughout the years, plus even re-record a new version in the studio, anyways, one can dream

    Leave a comment:


  • Soundchaser413
    replied
    Originally posted by carlmarx38 View Post

    It's all about the "mob rules" which have shaped cultural history for 2000 years......I do find it fascinating that the Eagles' Greatest Hits has sold over 38 MIllion albums, while something like Close To The Edge barely goes Platinum. People are Blind, and the average Musical IQ of your typical human is about 62.
    I wouldn't say it "barely" went platinum. They probably tallied those at the same time and didn't get around to it until 1998. It may very well have sold that many several years before that (maybe in the 70's). So maybe by the time they checked the numbers it was way more than platinum (maybe 1.5 million) but not enough to go double platinum.

    Sales don't mean a lot to a lot of people. Sometimes albums are obscure for a good reason and sometimes they sell a lot for a good reason. There are many very good lesser known albums that have only gone gold (if that) and many albums that have sold a lot that are not that good(much pop music). I find it interesting to see what sells. I don't write off something just because it has sold a lot. Dark Side Of the Moon, several Beatles and Led Zeppelin albums have sold tons.

    For AA, platinum means it has sold one million copies according to the RIAA (US album sales). In the UK it's different. If someone doesn't know or care about it that's fine by me. I like statistics so I find it intersting.
    Last edited by Soundchaser413; 01-20-2022, 10:09 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Grey Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post

    I don't know what 'goes Platinum' means? Sorry, bit of a British dunce on all this commercial stuff.
    It's a measurement of sales. Here's a website with all the details. Platinum seems to mean one million units sold.

    https://www.riaa.com/gold-platinum/about-awards/
    Last edited by Grey Wolf; 01-20-2022, 10:09 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ash Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by carlmarx38 View Post

    It's all about the "mob rules" which have shaped cultural history for 2000 years......I do find it fascinating that the Eagles' Greatest Hits has sold over 38 MIllion albums, while something like Close To The Edge barely goes Platinum. People are Blind, and the average Musical IQ of your typical human is about 62.
    I don't know what 'goes Platinum' means? Sorry, bit of a British dunce on all this commercial stuff.

    Leave a comment:


  • carlmarx38
    replied
    Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post

    I have no idea what 5x platinum means? It would never occur to me to try and equate the critical regard in which an album is held with its commercial performance, and to think that significant. My brain just doesn't work like that. It seems reductive to me, a millstone rather than a milestone, so to speak.
    I have no interest in Rush either way.
    It's all about the "mob rules" which have shaped cultural history for 2000 years......I do find it fascinating that the Eagles' Greatest Hits has sold over 38 MIllion albums, while something like Close To The Edge barely goes Platinum. People are Blind, and the average Musical IQ of your typical human is about 62.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ash Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by Soundchaser413 View Post

    I think the question is why should they not be? Moving Pictures by Rush was certified 5x platinum after it's 40th anniversay. Someone probably figured "hey, it's getting more attention now because of an anniversary so let's see if that has translated to more sales. " Sales is not the be all end all but it's nice when milestones like that happen and with an album like CTTE which has garnered a lot of accolades in the past several years(not just by music fans but critics as well) it seems reasonable to me that someone would be curious if that has translated to more album sales as well. What better time to investigate that then a significant anniversary(like what was done with Moving Pictures)?
    I have no idea what 5x platinum means? It would never occur to me to try and equate the critical regard in which an album is held with its commercial performance, and to think that significant. My brain just doesn't work like that. It seems reductive to me, a millstone rather than a milestone, so to speak.
    I have no interest in Rush either way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Soundchaser413
    replied
    Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post

    Why should the units shifted be significant with regard to an Anniversary reissue or a documentary?
    I think the question is why should they not be? Moving Pictures by Rush was certified 5x platinum after it's 40th anniversay. Someone probably figured "hey, it's getting more attention now because of an anniversary so let's see if that has translated to more sales. " Sales is not the be all end all but it's nice when milestones like that happen and with an album like CTTE which has garnered a lot of accolades in the past several years(not just by music fans but critics as well) it seems reasonable to me that someone would be curious if that has translated to more album sales as well. What better time to investigate that then a significant anniversary(like what was done with Moving Pictures)?
    Last edited by Soundchaser413; 01-20-2022, 08:18 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ash Armstrong
    replied
    Originally posted by Soundchaser413 View Post

    Maybe it's time to tally up the sales for it again too. CTTE went platinum in 1998 and Fragile went two times platinum then. It's possible CTTE is double by now also.
    Why should the units shifted be significant with regard to an Anniversary reissue or a documentary?

    Leave a comment:


  • Soundchaser413
    replied
    Originally posted by Gilly Goodness View Post
    https://youtu.be/72IEt52VQ4w

    expect big anniversary as TYA and F have passed by with little fanfare. Hope they do a doco and maybe even a special concert.
    Maybe it's time to tally up the sales for it again too. CTTE went platinum in 1998 and Fragile went two times platinum then. It's possible CTTE is double by now also.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gtkgasman
    replied
    [QUOTE=Ash Armstrong;n3556]

    It's going to need something pretty special included for me to buy the album again. [/QUOTE

    Hahaha

    My next copy will come with obligatory question “how many of copies of this do you have and need?” 😂😂😊😊. And “didn’t we just get this already?” 😁😁😁.




    Leave a comment:

Working...
X