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Close to the Edge- Rating out of 5?

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    Close to the Edge- Rating out of 5?

    The one that defines prog rock itself? What is your take?
    20
    5
    95.00%
    19
    4
    5.00%
    1
    3
    0%
    0
    2
    0%
    0
    1
    0%
    0
    The Definitive YES Albums

    -The Yes Album-Fragile-Close to the Edge-Tales From Topographic Oceans-
    -Relayer-Going for the One-Drama-90125-Big Generator-Union-Talk-
    -The Ladder-Magnification-Fly From Here-The Quest-

    #2
    5 stars. My favourite Yes album. Perfect from beginning to end.

    Comment


      #3
      3

      It drags in some places. And the lyrics? What is Jon goin' on about?

      Maybe too pastoral in places.


      Wish I could be more positive.


      Only kiddin'!

      CTTE changed my life. It's church for me. It's the air I breathe. It's the wine I drink. It's the last music I hope I go out with.

      CTTE50. No boxset?

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Gilly Goodness View Post
        CTTE50. No boxset?
        The question is, what could they put in a box set to entice you to purchase it for the third/fourth/fifth/sixth* time?

        *Vinyl, CD, SW remix for me, so that three already… Not quite Thick as a Brick territory, but we'll see…

        Comment


          #5
          5! In my top 3 Yes albums along with Relayer and Drama.

          As far as seeing it live again? Not interested. I have seen those songs performed so many times, and on all authentic cylinders, I'm not interested in diet Yes. I'll celebrate the Anniversary watching some classic Youtubes.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Homemade Parachute View Post

            The question is, what could they put in a box set to entice you to purchase it for the third/fourth/fifth/sixth* time?

            *Vinyl, CD, SW remix for me, so that three already… Not quite Thick as a Brick territory, but we'll see…
            I thought this was the best version of the CTTE album

            Comment


              #7
              Close To The Edge. Well that's the album where if the question is asked "Mommy, what's prog rock?" they get handed a copy of Close To The Edge. It's prog 101. Study of this genre has this album mentioned in the first chapter in the book, and probably in the forward on page one. But is it that good?

              The GOOD:

              See above. This has all the elements in place - virtuoso musicianship, yet not for its own sake - these are actually songs with actual melodies, regardless of how long they are. Vocals harmonies, strange lyrics about the search. Search for what? The answer to heavy spiritual stuff, or the search for the perfect feeling on a perfect day - maybe both. This is Yes five albums in, gradually moving towards this album.

              Only three songs, lengthy but every note in place. Even guitar and organ solos seem to have a purpose within the compositions rather than serve as the 'jammy part' to extend a track. All five instrumentalists are carefully blended, no one is out of place or along for the ride. These are contributing participants. Wakeman, on his second Yes outing, is now fully entrenched in the band and has upped the keys department by miles. He had become the band's Keith Emerson. Howe plays like an electrical storm, Squire rock solid and domineering with bass and support vocals alike. Anderson is in touch with the divine. Whether his divine comes from mushrooms or not is up for speculation. He conducts the orchestra, and Bruford can't wait to apply what he's learned from all of this to the Crimson King.

              The sidelong title track is a defining epic track that sets a blueprint not only for future epics from Yes but for other progressive art rock bands as well. CTTE wasn't the first album side suite from a band, but it remains one of three definitive side long epics that define the concept - (the other two are Tarkus and Supper's Ready). It is their first rock symphony, and it stood the test of time. That hammond solo towards the end - hot damn. The spacey ethereal bit before the I Get Up I Get Down section, you can hear the cosmic ripples. Sublime. And You And I is a masterful tone poem, which used to be the sole CTTE track played live for a good 15 years. The there's Siberian Khatru (what the flip is a Siberian Khatru?), a barnburner. I love the ending when they lock into the groove, similar to the end of Perpetual Change. In fact, this album even works in reverse - side one: Siberian Khatru, bang! Right out of the gate, then followed by the more pastoral And You And I. Side two is the title track, their masterwork. Comparable in this format to Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony 6 - a lively movement(SK), a gentler movement(AYAI) and then a long finale in 3 movements(CTTE). I know that's a stretch, but naw not really.

              I'm one who likes the green album cover - simple, basic. The music within, anything but.

              The BAD:

              Well, seeing as how CTTE is basically Yes' Dark Side Of The Moon, it gets a heavy representation in live concerts. There are at least three live albums which replicate the entire album live, sometimes in sequence and sometimes spread throughout the set. Other live albums have one or two tracks. And as there are only 3 tracks anyway, it's not hard to get your CTTE fix with any given live album or when you go to see a Yes show. Familiarity breeds contempt, as they say, and though I don't have 'contempt' for the album, overexposure may have slightly rubbed off some of the edges of CTTE for me. I sometimes have to not hear it for a long while to get back my wonder for this album. One way to do that is to not hear live versions for a while, then listen to the studio album as if forgotten.

              The UGLY:

              Is there anything ugly about Close To The edge? It's such a landmark album, its importance to the genre cannot be overlooked. I would say that live versions of And You And I have often been better than the album version, I prefer Alan's style over Bruford's on this particular track. More powerful live, though they used to cut out the acoustic intro and just launch into it, which was just as effective.

              Again, CTTE overkill has made the album slightly less special because Yes treats it like its their Dark Side OF The Moon, but it's really really really good. I almost gave it a solid 4+, but it's such a defining album that it would be like betraying the sacred oath or something to give it anything less than a 5. So by popular demand, 5 it is. Close To The Edge, a bold musical statement, a rich listening experience.

              Comment


                #8
                It's the best record they have made. A couple of others have come close, but it's the best.

                Comment


                  #9
                  I'll give the unpopular minority opinion:

                  CLOSE TO THE EDGE is a 5, but there's several Yes albums that I rate more highly.

                  Why? Because a quarter of the album is Siberian Khatru, which somehow I find irritating despite the nifty oddball time signature. That funky riff is pretty neat, but, man, they sure beat it to death. Kind of like if the Beatles decided to keep that "Na, na na, nanana na" part of the song going for another 5 minutes.

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                    #10
                    5, full stop.

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                      #11
                      Close To The Edge is the finest record they made. There's a few songs from other albums that I like a little better, but sonically CTTE is a masterpiece from start to finish.

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                        #12
                        I’m not a huge fan of Siberian Khatru either. I recognise it does very interesting and innovative things in terms rhythm in rock, but it nonetheless bores me a bit. Close to the Edge - I don’t like the opening at all*. It’s something that also infects parts of Fragile - they take a motif and thrash the arse off it - all together in competition, not harmony. For me it does seem like an exercise in virtuosity for its own sake. Thankfully this is more or less the last time they did that. Possibly they’d got it out of their collective systems.

                        Then there’s the bass in the ‘seasoned witch’ section. It comes in on the offbeat against the rhythm guitar riff and it’s mixed well to the fore. It just goes thump… thump. It always seems like a bit of a sore thumb.

                        The pipe organ… again perhaps the passage of time has not been kind, but as it comes in it does seem very over the top to the degree it becomes somewhat tasteless bombast.

                        *Not so much the tweeting - that’s become a cliche but it wasn’t at the time, although that too is the sort of novelty that wears out with time.

                        And You and I - I can’t find anything to fault in. It’s one of the band’s greatest masterpieces. When they get it right live it can be emotionally overwhelming.

                        For all that and for all I think the three succeeding albums are all better, all more successful at what they set out to achieve, it’s hard to argue that CttE is not the seminal, quintessential progressive rock album. As such if I were minded to give marks like it was a child’s essay, it would have to be the top grade.
                        Last edited by Chris2210; 05-17-2022, 02:27 AM.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Mr. Holland View Post
                          5 stars. My favourite Yes album. Perfect from beginning to end.
                          Amen.

                          Wait a minute, the cover. Why the dull green? Was it their version of the white album, the green album?

                          But what’s this about Siberian Khatru being boring? Yes, the main theme repeats, but, and that’s a Big Butt, there’s all kinds of things on top of it, and that makes all the difference! There are parts of SSOTS and HOTS that would easier qualify as (somewhat) boring.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            A 5 without a doubt

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                              #15
                              It could be the quintessential progressive rock album while not necessarily being the quintessential YES album.

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