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    Trevor Rabin solo albums rank

    For Rabin fans - Ranking the Trevor solo albums in how I enjoy them. As his film scores are too numerous, I was just going for the 'rock' type ones. I'm not counting Yes or Rabbitt either, just solo albums. As always, not a definitive rank, just how I like them. How do you rank them? Or maybe just talk about the ones you like or have heard. Mine are:

    In descending order:

    7) Wolf (1981) - after his quirkier first two solo albums, this one is more of a straight ahead rock album, you may think you're listening to Loverboy or Billy Squier. Nothing wrong with that, but doesn't take too many chances. 'Heard You Cry Wolf' is a rock gem though.

    6) 90124 (2003) - Well lesser sound quality demos of Yes material better recorded later on doesn't float my boat 100%, though still worth a listen. 'Can You Feel My Love' is a forgotten gem that I think Jon Anderson sang a demo of too, so I suppose it was offered up for inclusion on Big Generator maybe? Promenade from Pictures At An Exhibition has that guitar in full on Brian May, and Miracle Of Life demo is nice.

    5) Live In LA (2003) - live album recorded from the tour for Can't Look Away in 1989. As I was too young to get into the clubs in 1989, I didn't get to see Rabin live, so this CD will have to do. Good 1-cd live album, but it would have been nice to have the whole show. The best tracks are actually not the Yes songs, but the solo ones. Eyes Of Love and Cry Wolf are sublime, and the title track Can't Look Away is powerful and extended into a long Starship Trooper-like jam at the end. In fact, Can't Look Away is Rabin's Starship Trooper. It locks on and really sounds good. The Yes ones - outside of Changes maybe- are a little, meh. Ok, I guess.

    4) Face To Face (1979) - second album, nice driving down the road album. A bit of a pomp rock album with some of those glammy moments from the first album still around. 'Always The Last One' pumps. I like that track, and 'I'm Old Enough To Make You A Woman'. Styx harmonies, squealy guitar, rock & roll stuff.

    3) Jacaranda (2012) - instrumental/fusion album from Rabin, definitely for the prog-leaning Yes enthusiast. If you liked Peter Banks instrumental jazzy albums you'll go for this without a doubt. Great playing and textures here. When he goes for some country pickin', well, take that, Mr. Howe. Nice female vocals on one track. Anerley Road is real tasty. The album has a good atmosphere and playing, though I admit it is a little light on actual songs or identifiable melodies. A bit of noodling, but better than a lot of fusion/noodler albums.

    2) Beginnings/Trevor Rabin (1978) - his first solo album. A little bit of lingering Rabbitt sound, and some real nice Styx/Queen-level harmonies. 'Live A Bit' sounds like a Queen/Floyd hybrid. Nice solo at the end. 'Red Desert' is cool. I think I read he wasn't too big on Queen, but there is a total glam rock element at play here. A friend of mine thought the ballads sounded like Bay City Rollers. The original 'Beginnings' cover is kinda ugly, I prefer the more glammy cover when it was reissued as 'Trevor Rabin'. A good first album

    1) Can't Look Away (1989) - his only solo album as a member of Yes, at least I think he was still a member while ABWH were around and the official Yes were in limbo. That's always been a hazy scenario for me. Like a 'YesWest' album, good songs and hooks, the most Yes-like album he has and probably the one Yes fans know more that any of his other solo things. Title track and Sorrow (Your Heart) sound like Yes songs. Eyes Of Love is a good one too. Can't Look Away was a high profile album
    with cassette singles and an MTV video featuring Trevor polka dot clothes and an iguana climbing up his head. Good way to cap off the 80's. I have a soft spot for this album, and would love a new vocal/song/Yessish solo album, but I won't hold my breath.

    That's my ranking.

    #2
    Live in LA, Jacaranda and Can't Look Away are my favourites. His earlier solo stuff sounds a bit unfinished to me. I certainly think being in Yes helped him develop as a musician -these releases seem light years ahead of what came before 90125.

    Would love him to finish the long promised solo album that is supposed to be half written - it would be the most exciting news concerning an ex-member of the band for years - but sadly I have learned not to hold my breath. I'm afraid I don't think we will ever see it. C'mon Trevor, prove me wrong!!

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      #3
      Can’t Look Away, and from that only Something To Hold On To (better than Love Will Find A Way) and Sludge (Under three minutes of crazy stuff).

      Jacaranda, well, a lot of that would have made for excellent intros, outros and interludes on the ARW album that never was.

      Comment


        #4
        To get the full measure of what I think of his solo output, you can read the essays I wrote about each album for the Changes review series on my blog.

        I would use a tier thingie normally, but my feelings have made it complicated. When Kevin and Matt asked me what were my favorites on the episode of YMP I was on, I stated it kind of like this:
        My personal favorite is Beginnings (Trevor Rabin). And I love both versions almost equally, with just the slightest edge going to Beginnings.
        Can't Look Away is a really well-made album and there's a reason it continues to be well-liked to this day. I enjoy listening to it for many reasons. Peak Trevor, from a solo perspective.
        Jacaranda is a work of art, 10/10, will listen to forever as it fulfills one of my long-held dreams for Trevor's career.

        Beyond that...I think Face To Face is the weakest album of the lot. It has some interesting moments but it doesn't hold up well. Wolf is better, more focused, with a great supporting cast, but it still has a few weak spots. I'm glad 90124 and Live in L.A. were archival releases, I enjoy them both, but I also feel like both were kind of missed opportunities in a way, but that's all down to Trevor and he doesn't always think of these kinds of things the way I want him to. But then again, why would he? LOL
        Last edited by luna65; 03-06-2022, 09:51 AM.
        Rabin-esque
        my labor of love (and obsessive research)
        rabinesque.blogspot.com

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Soundwaveseeker View Post
          'Can You Feel My Love' is a forgotten gem that I think Jon Anderson sang a demo of too, so I suppose it was offered up for inclusion on Big Generator maybe?
          No, it was for 90125. Trevor wrote it during the period of time after he was dropped from Geffen and shopping around for a new deal before he got the call from Chris.

          Originally posted by Soundwaveseeker View Post
          The original 'Beginnings' cover is kinda ugly, I prefer the more glammy cover when it was reissued as 'Trevor Rabin'.
          I have the exact opposite opinion from yours, lol. Trevor Rabin had two covers and the one which is most-known is hideous. The one which was Europe-only (I think) is better, if only because it doesn't have that stupid faux 3D filter or whatever it was.
          Last edited by luna65; 03-06-2022, 09:50 AM.
          Rabin-esque
          my labor of love (and obsessive research)
          rabinesque.blogspot.com

          Comment


            #6
            I would have liked a full-Yes version of Can You Feel My Love, but the demo is pretty well fleshed out.

            It's cool that Beginnings/Trevor Rabin is your favorite one. Beginnings is the best of the early Rabin albums I think, with the most variety. The cover though, maybe I felt the artwork was too 'flowery' or psychedelic and didn't reflect the music within (I know, never judge a book by the...). What I did was flip the CD booklet over so the back picture shows. The back is a more appealing photo of a young Trevor Rabin. The alternate cover for 'Trevor Rabin' isn't too hot either actually where he looks like some blurry psychic vampire, but I take it over the flowery one. But for me, the third option is best - flip the 2003 reissue CD booklet over and you have the best cover for Beginnings/Trevor Rabin.

            Wolf is at the bottom of the pack for me (see what I did there...). It is more focused and has good players, but a bit average rock stuff. After doing this thread, I listened to Wolf on the way to the movies. Yeah, still at the bottom of my pack, but an ok rock listen. It sorta trails off towards the end.

            Would love some more from Rabin, shame ARW fizzled out. Maybe one day before too much longer.

            Comment


              #7
              1. Jacaranda
              - big gap -
              2. Can't Look Away
              3. Beginnings/Trevor Rabin
              4. the rest
              bottom. 90124

              Jacaranda aside, I think Rabin was often more interesting in a band context. I prefer Rabbitt to his early solo albums. CLA pales, to my ears, compared to his Yes work around the same period.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by bondegezou View Post
                1. Jacaranda
                - big gap -
                2. Can't Look Away
                3. Beginnings/Trevor Rabin
                4. the rest
                bottom. 90124

                Jacaranda aside, I think Rabin was often more interesting in a band context. I prefer Rabbitt to his early solo albums. CLA pales, to my ears, compared to his Yes work around the same period.
                That is pretty much my take as well. But I really do love those top 2 albums.

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