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Yessongs: the Motion Picture

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    #16
    I saw it at Hammersmith Odeon with a friend from school and my girlfriend of the time. There were just the three of us in the place for the late afternoon showing. It was awesome. I've never understood why people moaned about the quality, it seems fine to me on the VHS I have. [On a separate note, in the second half of the 70s Shepherds Bush Odeon used to show 2 films late night Saturday evening: often a pair of music films, sometimes sci-fi. I saw The Song Remains the Same, Crystal Voyager, Soylent Green, the awful Bolan film, and a whole bunch of other stuff. They never showed Yessongs tho.]

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      #17
      First saw Yessongs on VHS in a music class in 10th grade. Not sure if the teacher threw it on or she let a student bring it in. I remember someone saying that Chris Squire kinda looked like Eddie van Halen. We also watched Song Remains The Same on different day.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post
        Oh, those bass-pedals on And You And I

        I can remember a lot of pieces in the weekly music press about the Yessongs film at the time (Melody Maker, Sounds, even the NME), how within a certain time-frame it did better business than Jaws and such like.
        It's not a reach to admit that it's not of the best visual quality or sound quality, which is unfortunate. Even the remastered BluRay edition doesn't improve on the VHS that much, although I'm currently watching it, for the fourth or fifth time this year, on Prime Video in 'HD'.
        However, as an artefact of its day, it's precious and special. And it's 'my' Yes! And they rock and swing like a rocking, swinging mad thing!
        ​​​​​​I was lucky enough to see it in the cinema several times in the 70s, including on one occasion just a few days before the Going For The One shows at Wembley in 1977.
        ​​​​​​
        ​​​​​​Along with Pink Floyd at Pompeii, I unhesitatingly hold it up as a favourite concert film, certainly of its day, and for me it's visual and aural shortcomings don't detract one jot from it. If only it were the full show.....
        Yes. Yessongs and Floyd's Pompeii for me also. The thing you notice is the absolutely incredible energy and incredible musicianship of the players. White, Howe , and Squire are at their best in the 1970's when they were in their 20's.

        The music was played with an intensity and quickness that was amazing. The slow motion playing of these great songs this century illustrated to me at least the decline of the players talent due to age.

        Rush I believe was able to keep their fan base intact IMO because they never lost that energy and intensity. N. Peart called it a day when he knew it was time and you have to respect him and Rush for going out at the top

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          #19
          I saw Yes numerous times in the 1970's. Slept overnight on the sidewalk once in 1972 ? to get great seats. They sold out a 16000 seat basketball stadium in just 5 hours in those days.

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            #20
            Agreed! I remember playing the VHS so much of this concert that the already not-so-great sound quality got worse and worse! It sure was fun to watch though!! I still watch the DVD….Jon’s weird vocal solo…. Nah nuh nuh nahhhh nuh nuh nahhhhh kisses microphone….”Mr. Rick Wakeman!!” 😜
            Originally posted by Ash Armstrong View Post
            Oh, those bass-pedals on And You And I

            I can remember a lot of pieces in the weekly music press about the Yessongs film at the time (Melody Maker, Sounds, even the NME), how within a certain time-frame it did better business than Jaws and such like.
            It's not a reach to admit that it's not of the best visual quality or sound quality, which is unfortunate. Even the remastered BluRay edition doesn't improve on the VHS that much, although I'm currently watching it, for the fourth or fifth time this year, on Prime Video in 'HD'.
            However, as an artefact of its day, it's precious and special. And it's 'my' Yes! And they rock and swing like a rocking, swinging mad thing!
            ​​​​​​I was lucky enough to see it in the cinema several times in the 70s, including on one occasion just a few days before the Going For The One shows at Wembley in 1977.
            ​​​​​​
            ​​​​​​Along with Pink Floyd at Pompeii, I unhesitatingly hold it up as a favourite concert film, certainly of its day, and for me it's visual and aural shortcomings don't detract one jot from it. If only it were the full show.....

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              #21

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