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    #31
    Originally posted by Mr. Holland View Post

    Yes is of course whoever Yes is. We don't have a say in that. However I don't like an album or song automatically because it says Yes on the cover.
    Neither do I nor will I like something just because 4/5ths of the lineup that gave us close to the edge is on it


    god i really don’t like abwh and I keep listening to it hoping I will love it

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      #32
      Originally posted by Homemade Parachute View Post
      In a lot of ways, we're in uncharted territory, which is interesting.
      Uncharted territory for Yes, but very much charted for dozens of other bands facing the same challenges of ageing and band splits.

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        #33
        Originally posted by Homemade Parachute View Post
        TL;DR: Yes, the *members* of Yes can still make music that moves you as much as before, but it may not be on a Yes album.
        But, yes, I strongly agree with this. "A rose by any other name..." and all that. I'm not bothered what it says on the cover. I follow the activities of Steve Howe, Jon Anderson, Geoff Downes etc. because they still make music I like. Changing line-ups in Yes has introduced me to some newer band members who also make music I like, so I'll also follow the activities of Jon Davison etc.

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          #34
          I’m sure Jay has the gig going forward. He is an excellent drummer, but he doesn’t do anything particularly that “rocks my socks” frankly. But I’m pretty picky in the drum dept.

          And they don’t need or want some kind of innovator anyway. That would be silly.

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            #35
            Originally posted by bondegezou View Post

            But, yes, I strongly agree with this. "A rose by any other name..." and all that. I'm not bothered what it says on the cover. I follow the activities of Steve Howe, Jon Anderson, Geoff Downes etc. because they still make music I like. Changing line-ups in Yes has introduced me to some newer band members who also make music I like, so I'll also follow the activities of Jon Davison etc.
            That is a well balanced and thoughtful post

            we want less of those lmao

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              #36
              Given that Howe is the only remaining classic member and Squire and White are both deceased the band is really no longer “fixable” in the sense that it was in 2012 or even 2017 where you could have brought back a couple of previous members and done something credible and fun with it. Anderson tried to make it happen with ARW and that project was ultimately a big disappointment. Maybe Anderson and Howe can stage a photo op one day where they hug, folks take their pics and get the “closure” they need or whatever. Done.

              As for the actual band, it’s so far gone that Howe might as well step down, Downes too, bring in Haun, Oliver Wakeman or whoever and they either get to swim and then soar like a damned phoenix or they sink like a stone, vanish into the murk and that’s the end of Yes. I’m at the “F* ck it. Let’s just do it and see what happens.” stage here. In a certain way Yes with zero classic members seems potentially more interesting than Yes with one classic member and it was Howe’s writing on The Quest that was the biggest disappointment for me, while Davison and Sherwood crafted tunes that were listenable.

              So let Toonces drive.

              Last edited by Frumious B; 05-31-2022, 04:11 AM.
              “Well ain’t life grand when you finally hit it?”-David Lee Roth

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                #37
                All things have a beginning and an end. If they do continue when Steve leaves I would hope they would call it something else.

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                  #38
                  The albums they are producing are not money makers. I give them credit for creating new music but at the end of the day these albums have little to no appeal even with a majority of longtime Yesfans.


                  I suspect the present band will continue with Jay until the band no longer can make money with their small tours.

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                    #39
                    Originally posted by bondegezou View Post

                    Uncharted territory for Yes, but very much charted for dozens of other bands facing the same challenges of ageing and band splits.
                    True, I was trying to think of an example that didn't make me sad, you know? (Apparently I need more classic rock in my library to jog my memory…) On the one hand, it's a creative bunch, who can write and perform new material. On the other, they're kind of yoked by their own focus on the 70s, and excluding a period of time when they had their most chart success, but now without a single representative member of that YesWest era*. So do they become Mike Love's Beach Boys, and coast on history? Journey still has two of its main and most prolific songwriters with very, very long-term stints in the band (and pretty much coasts on history); Jethro Tull has Ian, of course; Crimson has quite a few very long-term members; Toto? Kansas?


                    *Unrelated footnote: sure, I can Steve not wanting to play those songs, same as Steve Hogarth has not wanted to sing a log of Fish-era Marillion songs, but I always wonder about some of the other people involved, in this case Chris and Alan, and whether they might have enjoyed cranking out OOALH now and then… Oh well…

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                      #40
                      Originally posted by Frumious B View Post
                      So let Toonces drive.

                      OMG it's been so long since I saw Toonces. Thanks for a good laugh at the end of the day!

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                        #41
                        Originally posted by alex peters View Post
                        The albums they are producing are not money makers. I give them credit for creating new music but at the end of the day these albums have little to no appeal even with a majority of longtime Yesfans.


                        I suspect the present band will continue with Jay until the band no longer can make money with their small tours.
                        There is a reason the newest albums are not "money makers": Have you HEARD them? I mean, they're 'nice', but hardly breathtaking or trailblazing, or thunderous, or edgy. Gawd, they need Rabin back.

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                          #42
                          Originally posted by pianozach View Post

                          There is a reason the newest albums are not "money makers": Have you HEARD them? I mean, they're 'nice', but hardly breathtaking or trailblazing, or thunderous, or edgy. Gawd, they need Rabin back.
                          Not to overlook the fact that, apart from some of the hit acts of today, no albums are moneymakers anymore, certainly not for older acts. That ship has sailed some time ago. Touring is where the money is.

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                            #43
                            Originally posted by pianozach View Post

                            There is a reason the newest albums are not "money makers": Have you HEARD them? I mean, they're 'nice', but hardly breathtaking or trailblazing, or thunderous, or edgy. Gawd, they need Rabin back.
                            Agreed! That is the best you can say about the Yes albums of the last decade or so. They are "nice.".

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                              #44
                              I don't want to show disrespect towards Alan White but there has always been a strange tradition for YES studio albums over the years : Never more than 2 albums without a line up change. So this tradition will endure with Jay becoming a "new" fulltime member for the new album.

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                                #45
                                Originally posted by Homemade Parachute View Post
                                True, I was trying to think of an example that didn't make me sad, you know? (Apparently I need more classic rock in my library to jog my memory…) On the one hand, it's a creative bunch, who can write and perform new material. On the other, they're kind of yoked by their own focus on the 70s, and excluding a period of time when they had their most chart success, but now without a single representative member of that YesWest era*. So do they become Mike Love's Beach Boys, and coast on history? Journey still has two of its main and most prolific songwriters with very, very long-term stints in the band (and pretty much coasts on history); Jethro Tull has Ian, of course; Crimson has quite a few very long-term members; Toto? Kansas?
                                Jethro Tull only has Ian Anderson left. Two others joined in 2007 and the final two in 2017 and 2020, so numerically they have less connection to the past than Yes, but Ian Anderson has always had a more central role in the band than Steve Howe does in Yes. Arguably, Tull will always be Anderson + whoever. Tull plays plenty of old music live, but has also pushed new music.

                                King Crimson has ceased to be. On their final tours, they played nearly all old music and had long since given up releasing new studio material.

                                Toto only has one original band member regularly involved in Steve Lukather. Toto is Lukather + Joseph Williams, who joined for their sixth album in 1986. David Paich, another original member, sometimes guests with the band live and is supportive of Lukather controlling the Toto name, so a kind of a parallel to Tony Kaye. The band has continued to record, but set lists are mostly older music.

                                Kansas still has one original member in Phil Ehart and another very early/classic line-up member in Rich Williams, but it's notable that they people who wrote nearly all the music, Livgren and Walsh, are long gone. The bassist, Greer, joined in 1985, after their best known albums, but a fair while ago. The band has continued to record, but set lists are mostly older music.

                                Who are some other classic progressive rock bands?

                                Gong has no original members. The band started in 1967, but the current line-up's longest-running member started in 2007.

                                Tangerine Dream has no original members. The band started in 1967, but the current line-up's longest-running member started in 2005.

                                Pink Floyd had ceased to be, but re-appeared for a charity single with one original member and one very early/classic line-up member.

                                Genesis has ceased to be. They did tour recently with two original members and one early/classic line-up member. They played all old music and haven't released new material for decades.

                                ELP has ceased to be. Rush has ceased to be. Can has ceased to be. Gentle Giant has ceased to be. UK has ceased to be.

                                PFM has one original member and another early member.

                                Camel has one original member. The bassist joined in 1979. Haven't done new music for many years.

                                Magma has one original member, but Christian Vander is like Ian Anderson in Tull.

                                Van der Graaf Generator is doing well, with one founding member and two very early/classic members. Supertramp has one founding member and two early/classic era members.

                                Renaissance has no original members, but consists of one classic era member in Annie Haslam and a bunch of new boys.

                                Caravan has one founding member plus two '70s members, although arguably from after the band's best period. They're joined by two newbies (including Lee Pomeroy).

                                In terms of younger bands, Marillion only has one founding member, but it's got three others from their "classic" early '80s period. They've had the same line-up since 1989. Asia is touring later this year with two original members, and a set list expected to be dominated by older music.

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