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Thread: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

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    Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    As in . . . covers OF Beatles tracks, NOT covers BY The Beatles

    I post an ongoing "Beatles cover song of the day" on my personal Facebook wall, but not on a dedicated FB page.

    It started out as a daily thing, but I've found that each one takes far more time to create than I would have thought. Finding and listening to all of the available covers is a blessing and a curse. For a few songs (like You Like Me Too Much) the pickings are pretty slim. But for others, there are sometimes a handful out of dozens available that are astonishingly good.

    They come in all genres.

    My methodology is to go by a list of songs arranged by date of 1st release, be it on a single or album, from the US or UK.

    I've then posted one (one at a time) from each year, starting with the first release of the year. So far I've posted 2-3 from each year. So far I've done 1962-1970 twice, and have gotten as far as 1963-1966.

    Since there were only two released in 1962, I went through that year by the beginning of the second go-round.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    BEATLES COVER SONG OF THE DAY:

    Love Me Do by Flaco Jimenez & Buck Owens

    Love Me Do was originally released as a single by The Beatles in the UK October 5, 1962. The single is actually the second of three versions they recorded , each with a different drummer. The first version, part of their Artist audition featured Pete Best on drums. The single version was recorded in early September with replacement drummer Ringo Starr. The album version was recorded a week later with session drummer Andy White, who had already been booked before Best was fired. Ringo played tambourine.

    This song is usually the song cited as an example for why Pete Best was sacked. The version he played on has some pretty awful tempo changes going into and coming out of the bridge, when Pete decided to change up the groove.

    There's actually several reasons for the sacking. Pete was actually considered to be the popular member of the band, and there was probably a tinge of jealousy. Ringo sat in with the band several times, and John, Paul, and George all liked him better personally AND musically. Pete was also not very versatile, and had a particular style that he generally used for many of the songs. That style was pretty much a thunder beat on every quarter note.

    And, of course, George Martin had already decided that he'd be using a session drummer for the Beatles' recording, a practice that was pretty usual for bands at that time.

    However, in a 2001 interview, Paul McCartney commented about Pete's firing:

    "It's like in the Beatles, we had Pete Best, who was a really good drummer, but there just was something, he wasn't quite like the rest of us, we had like a sense of humour in common and he was nearly in with it all, but it's a fine line, you know, as to what is exactly in and what is nearly in. So he 'left'[83] the band and we were looking for someone who would fit."

    "Pete had never quite been like the rest of us. We were the wacky trio and Pete was perhaps a little more sensible; he was slightly different from us, he wasn't quite as artsy as we were."

    Always the diplomat.

    The Beatles recorded a cover of a Buck Owens (and The Buckaroos) song, Act Naturally, in 1965.

    Owens, the legendary country singer teamed up with Flaco Jimenez (formerly of the Texas Tornados) for this rollicking version of Love Me Do released in 2000.

    Last edited by pianozach; 4 Days Ago at 09:06 PM.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    There are, of course, many other covers of this song, including ones by Bobby Vee in 1964, The Brady Bunch in 1972, and Ringo Starr in 1998.

    Flaco's version is from his 2000 album Sleepytown.

    Actually, this one is on The Chipmunks Sing the Beatles Hits, an album I actually owned as a child. I may still have it in a box in the garage somwhere.

    AND David Bowie performed the song live in 1974.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    However, in a 2001 interview, Paul McCartney commented about Pete's firing:
    "It's like in the Beatles, we had Pete Best, who was a really good drummer, but there just was something, he wasn't quite like the rest of us, we had like a sense of humour in common and he was nearly in with it all, but it's a fine line, you know, as to what is exactly in and what is nearly in. So he 'left'[83] the band and we were looking for someone who would fit."

    "Pete had never quite been like the rest of us. We were the wacky trio and Pete was perhaps a little more sensible; he was slightly different from us, he wasn't quite as artsy as we were."

    Always the diplomat.
    Oddly enough I was on YouTube about a dozen hours or so ago, just surfing around, and played these videos of Paul and John's recollections about the sacking of Pete Best.. First one is Paul on The Howard Stern Show. Don't know the origin of the Lennon one. So right - Paul is the diplomat with not a bad word to say, John on the other hand, well...


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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    John, in this audio clip, is like 180 degrees different in his 'tude than Paul toward Pete Best.


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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    I think the line trotted out at the time was that Pete Best missed an important gig because he had a cold, and Ringo stood in for him, or rather sat in. that convinced them that Ringo was the better drummer.

    How true that is I don't know. Probably the truth but not the whole truth.

    When Ringo was lying in bed with tonsilitis while his place on the Australian tour was being filled by Jimmy Nicoll, he must have wondered whether history was about to repeat itself.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by bob_32_116 View Post
    I think the line trotted out at the time was that Pete Best missed an important gig because he had a cold, and Ringo stood in for him, or rather sat in. that convinced them that Ringo was the better drummer.

    How true that is I don't know. Probably the truth but not the whole truth.

    When Ringo was lying in bed with tonsilitis while his place on the Australian tour was being filled by Jimmy Nicoll, he must have wondered whether history was about to repeat itself.
    That is what Paul said in the video interview above. Lesson: Never miss a day of work. lol!

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post

    Beginning guitar riff reminds me of a riff in Kenny Loggin's "Footloose", one of the worst popular pop songs ever (certainly of the 80's.) Riff works better in this song. With that harmonica like sound it has that New Orleans Zydeco type sound. Interesting. (Still like the original better.)

    I am glad you didn't spotlight the Alvin and the Chipmunks version. Painful!

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    ^^ Alvin and the Chipmunks was a lame joke that needed to only be told once. Sadly, it was told over and over again, just in case you missed the humour on earlier retellings.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by YesNY View Post
    Oddly enough I was on YouTube about a dozen hours or so ago, just surfing around, and played these videos of Paul and John's recollections about the sacking of Pete Best.. First one is Paul on The Howard Stern Show. Don't know the origin of the Lennon one. So right - Paul is the diplomat with not a bad word to say, John on the other hand, well...

    Yeah, but John was always pretty critical and dismissive of many things, including the Beatles, his own voice, his own songs, Paul's songs. (Never said a nasty thing about Yoko though . . . )

    John was also full of self-doubt, scared and scarred inside, insecure, volatile. And an undisciplined genius. Lazy. Loved being the fool, making faces and caustic remarks.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by bob_32_116 View Post
    ^^ Alvin and the Chipmunks was a lame joke that needed to only be told once. Sadly, it was told over and over again, just in case you missed the humour on earlier retellings.
    I'd play it on the 16-2/3 speed on the turntable to hear something closer to the actual singers' voices (creator Ross Bagdasarian as David Seville). Quite interesting how he had to over-enunciate all the lyrics, and overdubbed to get the three different voices of Alvin, Theodore, and Simon.

    It was a brilliant idea, brought about after the success of his song Witch Doctor in 1958. Witch Doctor was definately PRE-Chipmunks.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    I allow "Witch Doctor" because the high voice was part of the gimmick, presumably it was supposed to be the witch doctor doing his crazy chant. Same thing with "Purple People Eater". That's OK.

    What I find lame is just taking a song and putting the high voice on it, for no apparent reason than that you CAN.

    The 21st century equivalent is the synthesised drum that rises in pitch and volume, leading into the song's chorus. the first time I heard that, many yeears ago, I thought "That's clever, but kind of silly." Now every second frigging song on the pop charts has it.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    BEATLES COVER SONG OF THE DAY

    Please Please Me by Blondie

    Originally released by the Beatles in January 1963 as a single in the UK, where it charted at #2. In the US, Capitol Records, EMIs US distributor was offered the song, but THEY TURNED IT DOWN. It was then offered to Atlantic Records, who ALSO REJECTED IT. It was then offered to Vee-Jay Records, which released it in sometime in February 1963.

    And it flopped.

    BUT, after I Want To Hold Your Hand became a hit after its release in November 1963, Vee-Jay re-released Please Please Me in January 1964, and it became their "first" Top Ten hit in the US.

    Anyway, Blondie performed this version live for a BBC show in 2011.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    But, here's a real rarity . . . The prepubescent Maurice and Robin joined their older brother Barry (as Barry Gibb & The Bee Gees) in a version that's not all that bad. And all that is actually pretty funny considering they'd eventually end up starring in the ill-fated Sgt. Pepper film with Peter Frampton in 1978 after a pretty damned good career cashing in on the disco craze.

    Oh, and there's another Beatles tie-in, when it comes to the Bee Gees: The cover of their 3rd album, titled Bee Gees' 1st, was designed by none other than Klaus Voorman.

    Oh, my favorite part of this video is at 1:57, when Maurice turns the wrong way to exit stage after the song, and runs head-on into Barry, causing a chain reaction when Robin rear-ends Barry.



    Last edited by pianozach; 3 Days Ago at 07:27 PM.
    ---Pianozach---

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    Oh, my favorite part of this video is at 1:57, when Maurice turns the wrong way to exit stage after the song, and runs head-on into Barry, causing a chain reaction when Robin rear-ends Barry.
    I never heard that story, but I wonder if that was the inspiration for the song "Exit Stage Right"?

    In their very early days the Bee Gees were the most uncool looking band you ever saw. Everything about them: their clothes, their hair, their toothpaste smiles. If you wanted to create a fictitious high school boy band from about 1960, it would have looked like them. They released about a dozen singles, all of which flopped. Ironically, their next one, Spicks and Specks, topped the Australian charts as the boys were on the boat to the UK, having decided that they had little chance of making it in Australia.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    There's one more cover that I thought was pretty good.

    Julien Neel is a regular YouTube contributor that sings all parts of Barbershop Quartet versions of songs (including 12 Beatles songs). For me, BBSQ stuff resonates as I was a regular part of a professional BBSQ quartet for several years.

    Julien also does a nifty job with the video editing as well, inserting himself performing all four parts, in this case, Left to Right, Baritone (yellow bowtie), Bass (red bowtie), Lead (blue bowtie), and tenor (green bowtie).

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    But, wait . . . there's more.

    In my mind, there are many ways in which to approach covering a song, especially a hit song.

    Many artists will perform a fairly faithful reproduction of the original song, with the only difference being that now it's someone ELSE singing it rather than the original artist(s). Fans love this, and this type of cover is often done by people with universally loved or commercially distinctive voices. Some versions soften the song, others rough it up . . .

    The more artistically satisfying type of cover is when another artist reworks the original, creating a distinctive new arrangement. Think Yes' proggy cover of Every Little Thing, or Joe Cocker's rockin' blues version of With A Little Help From My Friends. Often it's simply converting a song to another genre, like the Barbershop Quartet version above. I've heard bluegrass, country, big band, jazz, punk, metal, choral, disco, a capella and other versions of Beatles songs from practically every genre imaginable.

    And now, since the advent of YouTube and videos made from cellphones, there's plenty of live versions of songs, and young men and women strumming their acoustic guitars and singing songs that are 50 years old.

    Also, there are so many variety shows from decades past, often with TV stars lip-synching versions both lame and spectacular, and now there's also covers by extraordinarily talented singers on competition shows like American Idol and The Voice

    Oh, and with the Beatles, there are plenty of very faithful versions of varying quality by Tribute bands from all over the world.

    So here's a rather wonderful version of Please Please Me that takes it into a somewhat undefined genre. Yeah, there's drums, bass and a couple of guitars, but this one features a female vocalist/fiddler (or is she playing that violin a bit more gypsy-ish?), and an accordionist and and ukelele-ist. In a minor key. In a slow swing tempo.

    I love this version by Deni Bonet.

    Last edited by pianozach; 3 Days Ago at 07:22 PM.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    And just one more . . .

    From Keely Smith, probably best remembered for her work with Louis Prima.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    The more artistically satisfying type of cover is when another artist reworks the original, creating a distinctive new arrangement. Think Yes' proggy cover of Every Little Thing, or Joe Cocker's rockin' blues version of With A Little Help From My Friends. Often it's simply converting a song to another genre, like the Barbershop Quartet version above. I've heard bluegrass, country, big band, jazz, punk, metal, choral, disco, a capella and other versions of Beatles songs from practically every genre imaginable.
    True, but one thing I would add is that there has to be a point to using THAT song and not some other, or writing your own. For example, maybe I am biased because I am not really a fan of bluegrass, but I have heard many bluegrass renditions of well-known songs that left me thinking "Yes the song can be rendered in this style, and yes it sounds authentically bluegrass, but why bother? Why not just play Foggy Mountain Breakdown?" In other words, the song has to have some quality that elevates it above other bluegrass songs.

    Some years ago at a local community concert-in-the-park some group did a disco version of Unchained Melody. My first reaction was "This sounds bizarre". My second reaction was "but it still sounds good." This is a song that is good enough to survive almost any genre transformation. Donna Summer did a very listenable version of MacArthur Park - it had the disco beat but still sounded like an amazing song.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by bob_32_116 View Post
    True, but one thing I would add is that there has to be a point to using THAT song and not some other, or writing your own. For example, maybe I am biased because I am not really a fan of bluegrass, but I have heard many bluegrass renditions of well-known songs that left me thinking "Yes the song can be rendered in this style, and yes it sounds authentically bluegrass, but why bother? Why not just play Foggy Mountain Breakdown?" In other words, the song has to have some quality that elevates it above other bluegrass songs.

    Some years ago at a local community concert-in-the-park some group did a disco version of Unchained Melody. My first reaction was "This sounds bizarre". My second reaction was "but it still sounds good." This is a song that is good enough to survive almost any genre transformation. Donna Summer did a very listenable version of MacArthur Park - it had the disco beat but still sounded like an amazing song.
    Good points.

    Music is so very subjective. Songs, and versions of songs, that you or I like may not resonate with the gun-totin yahoo down the street. But he may love the thrash metal version of Helter Skelter.

    I've always been attracted to musicianship, and complexity in music. I also tend to focus on the arrangements and production of songs.

    For this thread, I'm pretty jazzed about 95% of Beatles songs to begin with, and I love hearing them in different, fresh, unusual and clever ways. When I was a kid I'd listen to the Beatles records every way that I had at my disposal - my turntable had treble and bass control, four different speeds (78, 45, 33 ⅓, and 16 ⅔ RPM), and left/right control. I listened to those songs in every configuration possible, including backwards.

    When a song plays I often hear the individual components, rather than focusing only on the overall result. That's probably why I still enjoy the stereo versions of Beatles songs rather than the mono ones.
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