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Thread: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by MrZuLu View Post
    Ok ...I'll bite...

    How can you plagiarize your own composition?
    I intended that as a joke. Sorry if the irony was not obvious enough.

    However: having said that, John Fogerty was sued by someone in the record company for doing just that: plagiarising himself. Of all the music copyright court cases through the years, that must surely be one of the most bizarre.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Of course, as expected, I’m kinda partial to barbershop versions of songs.

    Here’s a barbershop choir, the Alexandria Harmonizers.

    It's so far out, it's in.

    Hey, I’ve heard that nerdy is the new “cool”.



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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    ^^ Beautiful plumage!





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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    #24

    BEATLES COVER SONG OF THE DAY

    Hey Jude


    Arguably one of the best songs from a band that had a over a score of hits over eight years. Every album they release went to #1 somewhere, and the group racked up a record total of 20 No. 1s, with almost every single released going to #1.

    Anyway, Hey Jude was the A-Side of the second single released in 1968 (in August), five months after Lady Madonna.

    At the time it was the longest single ever to top the British charts, and remained the longest number-one hit for nearly a quarter of a century.

    R&B singer Wilson Pickett released a cover In 1968 with a young Duane Allman creating quite a splash with his soloing at the end. The Lettermen also covered it that year.

    In 1969 Tom Jones, Dionne Warwick, José Feliciano, Smokey Robinson and the Miracles, Diana Ross and the Supremes, [a strange-sounding arrangement from] Bing Crosby, Petula Clark, [a swinging big-band arrangement from] Ella Fitzgerald, The Temptations and dozens more all released covers of Hey Jude.

    Hey Jude was one of the few Beatles songs that Elvis Presley covered, when he rehearsed the track at his 1969 Memphis sessions. That recording was released on the 1972 Elvis Now album.

    There are covers that range from string quartet, electric sitar, electric thrash guitar solo, New Age guitar, Pan pipes, Gregorian Chants, you name it. Some of the more interesting versions include one from Earl Scruggs playing banjo, the aforementioned Ella Fitzgerald version, one from Count Basie & His Orchestra, ukulele (Kayla Estes), saxophone (Warren Hill), pan flute (Marco Antonio Valverde) minor key (Tyler Ward & KHS), and Sesame Street did a version they called Hey Food.

    There’s also covers by Katy Perry, The Brothers Johnson (All This and World War II), Joe Anderson (Across The Universe), the cast of Glee (Darren Criss, Becca Tobin, Chord Overstreet, and Jenna Ushkowitz)

    ANYWAY, here's my pick for BEATLES COVER SONG OF THE DAY

    Hey Jude

    Wilson Pickett featuring Duane Allman

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    It's pretty easy to understand why "Hey Jude" was (a) so popular, and (b) so extensively covered. Despite the massive list of Beatles hits that preceded it, this is one of the few times where a song of theirs captured that elusive element called "soul". No doubt PZ can identify others; at the moment I can only think of "Let It Be" (which of course had not yet been released) and "You Really Got a Hold On Me" (a much earlier release that was in any case a cover).

    The melody of "Hey Jude" is just simple enough to be quickly memorable for the listener, and easy for the musician to pick up, without being banal. The lengthy ending edged into dangerous territory - most of the covers that I heard simply ended the song with no fade-out, or else a much shorter fade-out than the Beatles' version. The public however was in a forgiving mood for this sort of thing at that time; the Beatles had already tested the waters with "All You Need Is Love", and Richard Harris' rendition of Jimmy Webb's 7-minute long "MacArthur Park" had been hugely successful, topping the charts in many places and showing that the 3-minute rule was one that was allowed to be broken on occasion.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by bob_32_116 View Post
    It's pretty easy to understand why "Hey Jude" was (a) so popular, and (b) so extensively covered. Despite the massive list of Beatles hits that preceded it, this is one of the few times where a song of theirs captured that elusive element called "soul". No doubt PZ can identify others; at the moment I can only think of "Let It Be" (which of course had not yet been released) and "You Really Got a Hold On Me" (a much earlier release that was in any case a cover).

    The melody of "Hey Jude" is just simple enough to be quickly memorable for the listener, and easy for the musician to pick up, without being banal. The lengthy ending edged into dangerous territory - most of the covers that I heard simply ended the song with no fade-out, or else a much shorter fade-out than the Beatles' version. The public however was in a forgiving mood for this sort of thing at that time; the Beatles had already tested the waters with "All You Need Is Love", and Richard Harris' rendition of Jimmy Webb's 7-minute long "MacArthur Park" had been hugely successful, topping the charts in many places and showing that the 3-minute rule was one that was allowed to be broken on occasion.
    Several good points here.

    I think the extended ending of Hey Jude deserves a bit of discussion though. It's usually cited as being unprecedented at the time, but while the Beatles certainly were musical innovators, they, like many white artists before and after, appropriated music from other cultures and genres. Elvis and Pat Boone took good R&B songs and got them airplay, and the Beatles did the same. I just read that Bruno Mars (his mother is Filipina and his father is Puerto Rican and Jewish) has been accused of "cultural appropriation" for blending elements of funk, soul, R&B, reggae and hip-hop in his music --- genres that are historically and traditionally African-American. Of course, while growing up Mars was almost exclusively influenced by black music. So I'm not even going to attempt to take up this discussion other than this acknowledgement.

    But, as you point out, Hey Jude was "soulful". And part of the soulfulness was the extended ending with Paul improvising vocals all over a short repeated 4-bar chant for 4 minutes.

    Of course, this type of "soloing" was probably done by someone else first, and probably live on a guitar in some jam band in an extended solo in the middle of a song. Later on you'd find plenty of this sort of thing trotted out by The Grateful Dead, the Allman Brothers, Pink Floyd, Dave Mathews Band, Cream, Phish, and dozens of others. And, offhand, it still wasn't much of "thing" before McCartney ran with it. Prior to August 1968 there was the blues-based Cream (1966-1968), the very blues-based Paul Butterfield Blues Band (1963-1971), and, of course, The Grateful Dead (formed in 1965). Jeff Beck claims that when he saw Iron Butterfly perform at the Galaxy Club in April 1967, half a year before the band recorded their first album, their entire second set consisted of a 35-minute long version of "In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida" (although the 17 minute studio version wasn't released until June 14, 1968, just 10 weeks prior to Hey Jude's release). Lesser known jam acts include Geno Washington & the Ram Jam Band (actually a soul band) , and Moby Grape (a folk/blues/country/jazz/rock/psychedelic acid rock band formed in 1966).

    The Beatles simply did three minutes of this at the end of a song until it faded out, instead of "wrapping it up" by returning to another verse and chorus for a big bang-up ending. And up till then there were very few songs with a massively long solo sections on a studio album.
    Last edited by pianozach; 03-15-2018 at 06:44 PM.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Hey Jude

    So, yes, The Lettermen covered it in 1968, and it's about as tepid and easy listening as you'd expect from them. Actually, it's a solo, sung by Jim Pike without backing vocals. So I won't bother posting a video. Their version is crap, especially by today's standards. Nothing to hear here. Move along now. It's so butt awful I won't even dignify it with a link.

    Elvis Presley's version sounds like an impersonator on a bad day. And, as one comment put it, it sounds as though Presley learned the lyrics on the way to the studio. The arrangement is pretty tame, and he sounds half asleep until the extended tag starts, then he starts in with some nice sounding, but still uninspired "Jude-Jude, Jude-Judy-Judy-baby"s. Hey! If you're an Elvis fan, you'll probably enjoy it so here's a link. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZpZCuu1DVPE

    Dionne Warwick's 1969 cover peaked at #11, and I've loved her voice since I first heard it. She sings it soulfully, but doesn't really bring anything new to it. She sings it, and, in a way, it's really pleasant. She does bring some nice improvisational chops to the ending, but it fades out in less than a minute. Here's a link: https://youtu.be/mKpZBogB7m4

    José Feliciano also covered it in 1969, and at least he tries to make it his own. As expected, instead of being accompanied by just piano, it's him accompanying himself on acoustic guitar. And his vocal style predates today's with plenty of melismas and stylings. Once the second verse starts the producer added horns and harp. He adds a short break with just guitar and recorder, then sings the last verse in Spanish, with some marimbas added to the mix. Then starts shredding acoustic lead for the 3 minute tag. Pretty damned impressive playing.

    [/QUOTE]
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    ^^ Thanks for not posting the Lettermen. What a vapid ensemble they were. Note perfect, with not one iota of soul.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by bob_32_116 View Post
    ^^ Thanks for not posting the Lettermen. What a vapid ensemble they were. Note perfect, with not one iota of soul.


    Oh, my pleasure.

    I listened to it so you wouldn't have to.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Since Elvis Presley was brought up, in his defense, he did a much better job on "Suspicious Minds" than with "Hey Jude" in the department of "Songs in Search of an End!" (I am thinking of starting a thread for such songs on the "Prog bands and Other.." sub-forum, and The Beatles "Hey Jude" would certainly be on there, along with Elvis' version of "Suspicious Minds")

    Suspicious Minds, released in 1969, is one of his best vocal performances of his entire career. Like "Hey Jude", much of the song's second half is taken up by a line of lyrics that is repeated over and over again. But it does have a perplexing 15 second fade out in the middle of them, only for the song to resume the repeating lines again. (No matter, the song topped the charts, becoming The King's last #1 song.)

    Back to The Beatles' "Hey Jude", to ask any other act to come even close to the quality of the original is perhaps impossible. One reason is Paul's shouts and screams and other vocal things during the last three minutes that keep keep monotony at bay during the last three minutes when the same line is sang by the chorus of singers 19 times. Paul's vocal versatility - the same singer who who was a balladeer for the first three minutes, lets it loose in soul music like improv's in the second half - is perfectly displayed in "Hey Jude". Normally songs with a lot of r&b shouts and screams can turn off listeners, like myself anyway, but Paul made it work out fine. The genius and talent of The Beatles at work again!
    Last edited by YesNY; 03-16-2018 at 01:39 PM.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by YesNY View Post
    Since Elvis Presley was brought up, in his defense, he did a much better job on "Suspicious Minds" than with "Hey Jude" in the department of "Songs in Search of an End!"!
    There was a short time in the late 1960s when I quite liked Elvis. Since he was a performer rather than a singer/songwriter, what that basically meant was that I liked the songs he chose to record, or that were chosen for him. "Suspicious Minds", "Edge of Reality" (his "comeback" single in this country), "Memories" and especially "Kentucky Rain".

    Unfortunately shortly after that he seemed to decide that he was a nostalgia act, and I lost interest.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by YesNY View Post
    Since Elvis Presley was brought up, . . .



    . . . Suspicious Minds, released in 1969, is one of his best vocal performances of his entire career. Like "Hey Jude", much of the song's second half is taken up by a line of lyrics that is repeated over and over again. But it does have a perplexing 15 second fade out in the middle of them, only for the song to resume the repeating lines again. (No matter, the song topped the charts, becoming The King's last #1 song.) . . .
    The false ending is a clever "hook". But . . .

    The "fade out / fade back in" had actually already been done by none other than The Beatles in their 1968 White Album song Helter Skelter. Just another studio trick used, this time in a song that's been noted for its "proto-metal roar" and is considered by music historians to be a key influence in the early development of heavy metal.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    HEY JUDE

    Smokey Robinson and the Miracles covered this tune in 1969. Except for Robinson's distinctive high tenor voice, this fairly tame cover could pass for any other R&B group cover. The backing band and standard vocal arrangement could be The Temptations, The Four Tops, The Chambers Brothers, The Isley Brothers, The O'Jays, The Drifters, The Platters, The Coasters or The Impressions.

    Well except for their reinterpretation of the tag, which sounds like the song will finally be going somewhere new and interesting. But it just fades out and its potential is snuffed.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    The false ending is a clever "hook". But . . .

    The "fade out / fade back in" had actually already been done by none other than The Beatles in their 1968 White Album song Helter Skelter. Just another studio trick used, this time in a song that's been noted for its "proto-metal roar" and is considered by music historians to be a key influence in the early development of heavy metal.
    ...and earlier still, on Strawberry Fields Forever.

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by bob_32_116 View Post
    ...and earlier still, on Strawberry Fields Forever.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Hey Jude

    1969 also saw Diana Ross and the Supremes covering Hey Jude, in a swingy upbeat soul version, from their album Cream of the Crop. I've always enjoyed Ross' vocals and energy. And speaking of energy, someone evidently let the bass player snort a quarter ounce of coke prior to this take.

    And, not surprisingly, it's pretty much ALL Diana, and no Supremes within earshot.





    So . . . how about something completely different? Bing Crosby also covered Hey Jude on his 1969 album Hey Jude Hey Bing!, giving it the honor of being the "title song" on the album.

    Now, I really love Bing, I do. In the late 30's and throughout the 40s and 50's his voice was unique, and he had an unsurpassed control that was marvelous. From 1931 to 1954 Crosby was a leader in record sales, radio ratings, and motion picture grosses.

    And I've heard recordings of him from as early 1927, the year he had his first hit single. Man, that guy could scat . . . for a white guy.

    And he was an innovator: He may have been the first white guy to "scat" on record. Crosby's love and appreciation of jazz music helped bring the genre to a wider mainstream audience. In fact, Crosby was one of the first singers to exploit the intimacy of the microphone, rather than using the deep, loud "vaudeville style" associated with Al Jolson, Rudy Vallee, and others. He was a huge stylist influence on later singers like Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Perry Como. As a vocalist he branched out from his earlier jazz stylings into many other genres, including Irish, French, R&B, Hawaiian, Country, Christmas, and ballads. In 1962, Crosby received the first Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. He pioneered the use of magnetic reel-to-reel tape, as well as the development of videotape.

    Crosby had 41 #1 Hits over his career (and had released 396 charting singles).

    But in 1968 he was 65 years old and both the industry and his voice had changed.

    And so had the technology. By 1968, those beautiful warm ribbon microphones were gone, replaced with harsh-sounding "dynamic" microphones, which were basically a coil of wire suspended in a magnetic field. Engineers mixed differently on solid state consoles, and the dynamic range was much greater.

    But, anyway, I'm including this cover of Hey Jude. This particular YouTube video features someone playing the LP on a quality vintage system, equalized to bring out the warmth in Bing's voice. His aging voice, and changes in recording techniques aside, he still had style and grace when he sang, and brought a song of the Beatles to an older generation, many of which despised that crappy new-fangled rock 'n' roll. It just proves how brilliant the songwriting skills of the Beatles were . . .

    Unfortunately, the clip is only 30 seconds long.





    Here's the whole song, in full stereophonic glory, bright and brassy, with Bing's voice mastered to emphasis his overtones and higher frequencies. He's mixed wa-a-a-ay up front, as though he's singing in your face.

    I think his choice of styling for the tag was misdirected, probably because he never understood why the hell the Beatles put a 3 minute repeating 4-bar tag at the end of the song, and just didn't know what to do with it. I think he'd have rocked it if he'd recording the tag in 1928.



    .

    Just one more thing: You know, the line, "So let it out and let it in" is really brilliant.
    Last edited by pianozach; 03-17-2018 at 12:32 PM.
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Often the next best thing to a Beatles final released version of a song is a Beatles studio take. This one is a keeper!


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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by YesNY View Post
    Often the next best thing to a Beatles final released version of a song is a Beatles studio take. This one is a keeper!

    Sweet!
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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post



    .
    "Pom pom pom pom-pom-pom-pom"

    The recording is actually quite dignified and well executed until that bit, which completely ruins the feel and turns it into slapstick. He should have just stayed and let the backing singers take over that part, just finishing by crooning the final "Hey Jude".

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    Re: Beatles COVER Song of the Day

    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    Hey Jude





    I think his choice of styling for the tag was misdirected, probably because he never understood why the hell the Beatles put a 3 minute repeating 4-bar tag at the end of the song, and just didn't know what to do with it. I think he'd have rocked it if he'd recorded the tag in 1928.

    .

    Quote Originally Posted by bob_32_116 View Post
    "Pom pom pom pom-pom-pom-pom"

    The recording is actually quite dignified and well executed until that bit, which completely ruins the feel and turns it into slapstick. He should have just stayed and let the backing singers take over that part, just finishing by crooning the final "Hey Jude".
    Here's what I'm talking about: Listen to him here, in 1932, scatting a mere 40 seconds into the song. I think he could have done something more than a grudging "Pom pom pom pom-pom-pom-pom".


    Last edited by pianozach; 03-18-2018 at 09:35 PM.
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