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View Full Version : ROCK PROGRESSIVO ITALIANO (RPI). Something else the Italians gave us other than pizza



Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 06:52 PM
Love RPI - love its history and how a number of English prog bands (Gentle Giant and Van der Graaf Generator to name a few) toured there back in the early 70's and won the hearts and minds of young Italians, both musicians and fans alike. From that fertile soil grew the likes of Le Orme, New Trolls, PFM (Premiata Forneria Marconi, Latte E Miele, Goblin, Banco del Mutuo Sooccrso and hundreds more. Some of these became giants in which future bands would rest on their shoulders. Many artists only recorded one album before sinking back into obscurity.

There is a rich history here with many stories to tell. A genre of it's own RPI has grown alongside of other countries endeavours with such bands as Ezra Winston and La Torre dell'Alchemesta and one of my favourites, La Maschera di Cera. I mean, where do you start with current RPI bands? There's Conqueror, Il Ruscello, Finesterre, Trono Del Ricordi and much much more.

The purpose here is hopefully to discover and rediscover a wealth of amazing prog by the Italians and share here that richness in appreciation. Molto bene!

I'll start off with a firm favourite by Le Orme


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4umsWDdJ3I

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 06:55 PM
One of PFM's finest tracks from a top prog album


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLxv_6FRPdM

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 06:57 PM
From one of the current crop of RPI artists, Maschera Di Cera


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTm8CJGjtno

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 07:01 PM
An amazing piece of prog from Il Trono Deo Ricordi


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1FruAjqdD9I

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 07:09 PM
Adriano Monteduro & Reale Accademia de Musica



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddXRLfEoS4U

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 07:11 PM
One of the best bands from Italy! Latte E Miele


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E2OXJy6zFag

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 07:17 PM
New Tolls - nuff said....


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4vpndAnGmo

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 07:56 PM
Mangala Vallis


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqMAbRxccG4

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 08:00 PM
Conqueror


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDANLfEMBYg

EtherReal
12-21-2014, 08:12 PM
Had this at age 16. Magnum Opus.
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qTLXbORe49U

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 08:32 PM
[QUOTE=EtherReal;2552022]Had this at age 16. Magnum Opus.
/QUOTE]

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=qTLXbORe49U[

Good choice. i've got the album somewhere. i bought a whole swag of Italian prog albums off of a few people locally here who had put them up for sale on something similar to eBay.

Just love the music and artwork. Excellent musicianship.

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 08:34 PM
speaking of great musicianship... Greenwall


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfATmJd27NQ

EtherReal
12-21-2014, 08:50 PM
speaking of great musicianship... Greenwall


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfATmJd27NQ

This is is best thread in years I can actually go hunting for all this stuff. I saw PFM twice in Toronto in the 70s and the crowd was all Sicilian Canadians coming to hear rock music sung in Italian.

I remember way way back that Contaminazione was so busy I tired of it quickly but going back 42 years, yes 42 years and plucking this out I am still blown away by this creation. It is such the stellar Classical-Rock-prog mash-up. Fn brilliant.

witeskyn7
12-21-2014, 08:58 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bT86HT8k0x0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bT86HT8k0x0


A definite Favorite.

witeskyn7
12-21-2014, 09:14 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDcUm3NRE9s#t=11

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDcUm3NRE9s#t=11

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 09:20 PM
Il Ruscello - a three piece band that went to England to record this album and capture that old prog and blend in the new a few years ago.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJn9YrrnNek

Relayer09
12-21-2014, 09:23 PM
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/B714Gi8s6zo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 09:23 PM
A relatively new band - Sinestesia


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18eh9-qu2i8

EtherReal
12-21-2014, 09:31 PM
guitar clnic


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vLxiphKLlIA

witeskyn7
12-21-2014, 09:37 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxmb5_NmKlg


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oxmb5_NmKlg

Relayer09
12-21-2014, 09:40 PM
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/m1-IfwGK2Wg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

EtherReal
12-21-2014, 10:14 PM
Can I also give a shout out to Spain's Bloque? Please?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaRIu5MNOik

Hot Ego Selected
12-21-2014, 10:33 PM
Can I also give a shout out to Spain's Bloque? Please?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZaRIu5MNOik


lol! Close enough. Good stuff though. Haven't come across them before.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 02:21 AM
H2O is an Italian prog band that really does fall under, well, under the radar. A band hard to find anywhere.

From what I know they did two albums - one in Italian and the other in English. I much prefer the Italian
one as per this track.

The workmanship these guys put into their instruments is incredible. It just build and builds with some
very net sounds. Enjoy!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a849LGJkX3o

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 06:31 AM
H2O is an Italian prog band that really does fall under, well, under the radar. A band hard to find anywhere.

From what I know they did two albums - one in Italian and the other in English. I much prefer the Italian
one as per this track.

The workmanship these guys put into their instruments is incredible. It just build and builds with some
very net sounds. Enjoy!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a849LGJkX3o

Nice to find music that didn't come from the Dick Clark LA Centrifuge. Oh and they sing in another language. Now we can try and Bing the lyrics.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 12:04 PM
Nice to find music that didn't come from the Dick Clark LA Centrifuge. Oh and they sing in another language. Now we can try and Bing the lyrics.

LOL! That's true. Years ago I used to fight it out with folk on various Prog related email discussion groups about Italian and Polish outfits.

They used to complain that it was either not in English therefore could not understand it, or they thrashed those vocalists that sang in English because it "sounded bad."

To me they didn't get the flavour or the context of what each of these artists in other countries put into their music. It sure as hell resonated with me and have
championed music from other parts of the world that doesn't have English as their first language. Hell, we all have accents.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 03:06 PM
Le Orme


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q0g4KD9S_Sw

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 03:09 PM
Blocco Mentale


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C72Wx3wXFsw

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 03:13 PM
Odissea - Domanda


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIKUKPFkqxY

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 03:27 PM
They recorded this album twice -once in Italian - then overdubbed in english as per this version. nice track with killer organ bits


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZmXt1_N2-dk

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 03:57 PM
LOL! That's true. Years ago I used to fight it out with folk on various Prog related email discussion groups about Italian and Polish outfits.

They used to complain that it was either not in English therefore could not understand it, or they thrashed those vocalists that sang in English because it "sounded bad."

To me they didn't get the flavour or the context of what each of these artists in other countries put into their music. It sure as hell resonated with me and have
championed music from other parts of the world that doesn't have English as their first language. Hell, we all have accents.

Yes my accent sounds like Valley Boy - Omma Gawd.

You are describing what I use to say about Quebec rock but I get my wife who is French to help me with the full meaning. Italian is somewhat like French so when I read it it makes sense for the most part. Listening to it I don't know what the F they are singing but if it is lyrical and beautifully delivered I don't care about the meaning so much as it sounds exotic anyway.

I'd to heard a song sung in Faroese and I absolutely loved it.

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 04:00 PM
I like these songs sung in their native tongue. I don't mind some English like Traveller by PFM but it is sad if people won't listen because it comes from another place they are not familiar with. Looking back I went to see PFM twice and ELP twice. I much preferred the PFM shows.

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 04:05 PM
Next question is where to buy all this music.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 04:16 PM
Next question is where to buy all this music.

I used to get a lot of stuff sent to me directly from the labels in italy because i was really passionate about it and would devote some of my shows to RPI (sometimes 16 hours = 4 shows X 4 hours each) on online prog radio I jocked for. I think some of these labels hunger for people from English speaking countries who want to champion the Italian prog sound. Also made friends with a number of bands (I had set up a " love Italian Prog Facebook page some years ago as well which a lot of the bands joined to meet new fans).

I would highly recommend checking Greg's Syn-Phonic Music page out at

http://synphonic.8m.com/

He has an amazing collection of Prog from all around the world (including from New Zealand where I located a CD of my favourite local band from the 70's Ragnarok which he stocked) and at quite good prices. nice bloke as well.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 04:20 PM
This has an almost 'Tull 'Locomotive Breath' start that spreads into a very richly textured song by Apoteosi. Nice


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xE3V9KrDlNE

Soundchaser_413
12-22-2014, 04:32 PM
I don't think Gentle Giant were that big in Italy. I think the two biggest English prog bands in Italy were Van der Graaf Generator and Genesis. Not so much GG or Yes although most big names had some effect no doubt.

Soundchaser_413
12-22-2014, 04:35 PM
For those who are caught up in the YES sound apparently the most YES sounding Italian band was Cherry Five(who eventually became Goblin).

luvyesmusic
12-22-2014, 04:42 PM
Thanks for starting this thread.

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 05:05 PM
One of PFM's finest tracks from a top prog album


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLxv_6FRPdM

This was my first taste of their music as ELP had them on their Manticore label. Saw them at historic Massey Hall around 1974. The violinist shredded two bows in the show. They were very good showmen. River of Life stood out as a superb number.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 05:18 PM
Thanks for starting this thread.

Cheers. it's great to find others who share the love and appreciate this wonderful sub-genre of Prog.

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 05:19 PM
I have been pretty much into Indy music and Post Rock in recent times but going over the Prog archives I realize what a treasure trove there is of great music and almost all from the vinyl era.

There is a lot of Neo Prog I like and it sure looks there is a bit of an industry now going. Peter Gabriel recently accepted a prog award which shocked me. There was so much love and attention back then and some great compositions.

Who'd have thought there would be version of Il Rovescio Della Medaglia out there still performing. RDM was much better doing their music in Italian IMHO.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 05:20 PM
I don't think Gentle Giant were that big in Italy. I think the two biggest English prog bands in Italy were Van der Graaf Generator and Genesis. Not so much GG or Yes although most big names had some effect no doubt.

You’re probably right. Although GG did inspire a number of bands like Maxophone and helped start the career of a number of Italian bands when they toured there and had them on as an opening act.

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 05:27 PM
Cheers. it's great to find others who share the love and appreciate this wonderful sub-genre of Prog.

Toronto FM radio was great in the early 70's and it was just before bands became huge business propositions. FM radio in the early days would play whole sides of albums by bands like PFM and RDM. They would follow that up by playing Roy Buchannan or Zappa and all kinds of interviews with the artists. I can remember Zappa in the radio studio in Toronto going through Apostrophe track by track and going off on Nixon like Tricky Dicky was Satan. Look at FM radio now it is Eye of the Tiger and Final fn Countdown...

ANTIOCH
12-22-2014, 05:32 PM
One of PFM's finest tracks from a top prog album


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cLxv_6FRPdM

I agree. And as I've said in the past, the Italian versions of these tunes seem to flow so much better than the American lyric versions.

Soundchaser_413
12-22-2014, 06:08 PM
I don't get the whole "RPI" tag though and I don't think it should be considered a subgenre but that's just my opinion. At least not any more than French prog or German prog, Mexican prog etc. Lots of countries have prog not just Italy and it's not as though other countries don't have indigenous influences in their music so really I don't get it. That is not to say Italian prog is not important it is and it is very over looked in some respects but the same could be said about any non English speaking prog.

Relayer09
12-22-2014, 06:43 PM
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/COSSSB2C-kQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 08:09 PM
I don't get the whole "RPI" tag though and I don't think it should be considered a subgenre but that's just my opinion. At least not any more than French prog or German prog, Mexican prog etc. Lots of countries have prog not just Italy and it's not as though other countries don't have indigenous influences in their music so really I don't get it. That is not to say Italian prog is not important it is and it is very over looked in some respects but the same could be said about any non English speaking prog.

It takes fans to make any of this happen. Are there any better prog fans than Italian prog fans? Seriously.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 08:58 PM
It takes fans to make any of this happen. Are there any better prog fans than Italian prog fans? Seriously.


That's true. Back in the 70's they had full stadiums filled with prog fans. Not just any Prog fan though- you had to be (or seen to be) either Left-Wing or Right-wing depending which band you followed. One right wing band made the mistake of playing at a stadium where it was filled with Left wing fans and feared for their lives. Prog was very political in Italy. almost like following a British soccer team. Passionate and fanatical. A lethal combination. you'll find a lot of their music interpreted into English has some sort of very melodramatic slant of life and death or some sort of political leaning.

Hot Ego Selected
12-22-2014, 09:06 PM
I don't get the whole "RPI" tag though and I don't think it should be considered a subgenre but that's just my opinion. At least not any more than French prog or German prog, Mexican prog etc. Lots of countries have prog not just Italy and it's not as though other countries don't have indigenous influences in their music so really I don't get it. That is not to say Italian prog is not important it is and it is very over looked in some respects but the same could be said about any non English speaking prog.


Check out Progarchives.com's page where they've split up the various categories to be found within the main heading of Prog Rock.

RPI has not only a very rich history but a very defined one that merits it's own genre. That's not to overshadow other Prog groups in other countries, but like in England and America it for a while was the norm on radio as well as TV. It was considered Pop music in Italy during its formative years.

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 09:49 PM
I agree. And as I've said in the past, the Italian versions of these tunes seem to flow so much better than the American lyric versions.

of gho--osts...

The Ingese works on this tune.

Soundchaser_413
12-22-2014, 10:20 PM
Check out Progarchives.com's page where they've split up the various categories to be found within the main heading of Prog Rock.

RPI has not only a very rich history but a very defined one that merits it's own genre. That's not to overshadow other Prog groups in other countries, but like in England and America it for a while was the norm on radio as well as TV. It was considered Pop music in Italy during its formative years.

Agree to disagree then. I understand that it's a legitimate category(at least to many)but not to me(and yes I am aware of progarchives and their designation of a subgenre called RPI). Like I said lots of countries have and had prog. Right now the most influential country for prog seems to be Sweden and I would even say the Swedish scene rivals the Italian scene from the seventies(no self respecting prog fan doesn't know who Anglagard is for example)and yet there is no Prog Sweden musica or any term that would be equivalent to RPI. I just disagree with the singling out of one country to make up an entire subgenre(not unless we do it for other countries and no I don't count Krautrock which to me is almost a derogatory term). Don't get me wrong. I think Italian prog is great(I refuse to refer to as RPI)but I don't think it should have it's own subgenre(at least not at the expense ofd others). Other people I have spoken to agree with me and in fact have mentioned it first(ie that it's silly for just one country to have it's own genre when others don't).

Soundchaser_413
12-22-2014, 10:26 PM
It takes fans to make any of this happen. Are there any better prog fans than Italian prog fans? Seriously.

Yes! Swedish prog fans! At least right now. There are lots of Italian bands out now it's true but I seriously think Sweden has surpassed Italy in the past ten to twenty years or so as far as influence and number of bands. What recent Italian bands are more influential or well known than Anekdoten, The Flower Kings, Anglagard, Par Lindh Project etc etc. I'm not saying there is no talent in Italy these days there is but just that you can't say Italian fans are better than everyone. Lots of Swedish fans and heck there are pockets of prog fans everywhere.

EtherReal
12-22-2014, 11:09 PM
Yes! Swedish prog fans! At least right now. There are lots of Italian bands out now it's true but I seriously think Sweden has surpassed Italy in the past ten to twenty years or so as far as influence and number of bands. What recent Italian bands are more influential or well known than Anekdoten, The Flower Kings, Anglagard, Par Lindh Project etc etc. I'm not saying there is no talent in Italy these days there is but just that you can't say Italian fans are better than everyone. Lots of Swedish fans and heck there are pockets of prog fans everywhere.

Good on them. In terms of vinyl prog rockers I would like make a minor plug for Canada. We tend delve into camp cheesiness but might as well go for it. Prog without the white tablecloth.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=JqZRD9Gas6o

http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=6ycowxwqwVQ

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LU78wkEpmY8

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=P3eF2oTXMZI

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 01:36 AM
Yes! Swedish prog fans! At least right now. There are lots of Italian bands out now it's true but I seriously think Sweden has surpassed Italy in the past ten to twenty years or so as far as influence and number of bands. What recent Italian bands are more influential or well known than Anekdoten, The Flower Kings, Anglagard, Par Lindh Project etc etc. I'm not saying there is no talent in Italy these days there is but just that you can't say Italian fans are better than everyone. Lots of Swedish fans and heck there are pockets of prog fans everywhere.

It isn't the intention of the thread to compete or downplay the contributions of other countries (which I also collect including Sweden, Norway, Netherlands, Japan, Canada, etc) but to focus on Italy and celebrate the rich abundance of Prog this beautiful country has thrown our way. It's great that it has crossed borders and been enjoyed by the rest of us. I don't, per se, prefer one over the other and my own interest sort of tends to go for Symphonic Prog regardless of nationality and trickles down to the rest like Space, Prog Folk and Prog Metal, and the rest, but all in all, happy we can recognise and relish diversity and envelop it all.

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:18 AM
Consorzio Acqua Potabile


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EPJoPSmnvy4

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:20 AM
Eneide


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXtqze-3wIk

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:22 AM
Goblin


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wxqJlSq2x0c

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:24 AM
Il Cerchio D'oro


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUQiU8aokco

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:27 AM
Great song by Locanda Delle Fate


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TGwNECQslEQ

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:31 AM
Malibran


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zF0skxoV2eg

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:33 AM
Mary Newsletter


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=os492cvvnnM

Camphire
12-23-2014, 05:40 AM
What's wrong with Pizza?
I think Pizza is enough of a contribution.
Pizza Pizza Pizza. Thank you Napoli!

And as if it's not enough..............then there's Gelato!
And Italian Red Wine! The Italians make the best red wine IMO, the Barolo, the Amorone, the Brunello dii Montalcino & the humble Chianti.
And then there are the men! Italian men!
And their beautiful language.
And Paganini!

There are loads of terrific Italian things. Fantastico!

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:45 AM
One of the best new Italian bands, Moongarden. From 'Songs from the Lighthouse' - couldn't find what I consider the best song from that album 'Dreamlord.' Might upload it to Youtube myself.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tr_DqSMbmcI

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:50 AM
What's wrong with Pizza?
I think Pizza is enough of a contribution.
Pizza Pizza Pizza. Thank you Napoli!

And as if it's not enough..............then there's Gelato!
And Italian Red Wine! The Italians make the best red wine IMO, the Barolo, the Amorone, the Brunello dii Montalcino & the humble Chianti.
And then there are the men! Italian men!
And their beautiful language.
And Paganini!

There are loads of terrific Italian things. Fantastico!

lol! Couldn't fit it all in the header!

They also came up with:

"La Dolce Far Niente" 'The Sweetness of doing nothing.' I'll drink and eat to that!

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 05:51 AM
Another Moongarden track from the same album.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtURSCzaUR8&list=RDRD0_yA3vyeE&index=2

EtherReal
12-23-2014, 06:51 AM
It isn't the intention of the thread to compete or downplay the contributions of other countries (which I also collect including Sweden, Norway, Netherlands, Japan, Canada, etc) but to focus on Italy and celebrate the rich abundance of Prog this beautiful country has thrown our way. It's great that it has crossed borders and been enjoyed by the rest of us. I don't, per se, prefer one over the other and my own interest sort of tends to go for Symphonic Prog regardless of nationality and trickles down to the rest like Space, Prog Folk and Prog Metal, and the rest, but all in all, happy we can recognise and relish diversity and envelop it all.

There is something about the singing in Italian that makes it special. Like the vocal parts on the RDM album I posted earlier. Also what a legacy. Mentioning Sweden you kind of drift off to the non vinyl era of Neo prog. Mentioning Canada you are in the realm of Classic Rock-prog where there was industry pressure to be a "Hair" band. I am glad for the more artsy Italian prog which tips it's hat to Van der Graf Generator (spelling) among other myriad influences. It also highlights what I truly feel about Yes. Yes became an institution and reforming in North America made them go down a Classic Rock fork in the road. So it is sort of hard to have undying affection for a band that is/was so many different bands. Yes to me may have been a flagship operation of what became the prog genre but they were by no means the best at their craft whoever and whenever they were-are.

EtherReal
12-23-2014, 06:57 AM
I now have to sort through the archives created here and pluck some favs. In this era it is easy to go against collectibility and just fetch the preferred tracks but something tells me I am going to have to go the CD route purchasing most of this music. Must get back to Italy and rifle through some record shops. Milan should have a lot of this as that is where PFM comes from I believe.

Camphire
12-23-2014, 07:22 AM
lol! Couldn't fit it all in the header!

They also came up with:

"La Dolce Far Niente" 'The Sweetness of doing nothing.' I'll drink and eat to that!

Yes, sorry for sort of bringing the tone of the thread down a bit (so to speak)
I'll keep listening.

EtherReal
12-23-2014, 10:35 AM
What's wrong with Pizza?
I think Pizza is enough of a contribution.
Pizza Pizza Pizza. Thank you Napoli!

And as if it's not enough..............then there's Gelato!
And Italian Red Wine! The Italians make the best red wine IMO, the Barolo, the Amorone, the Brunello dii Montalcino & the humble Chianti.
And then there are the men! Italian men!
And their beautiful language.
And Paganini!

There are loads of terrific Italian things. Fantastico!

Or great architecture, paintings, sculpture, cities, Marconi, Grappa, Espresso and of course fabulous music.

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 02:58 PM
Panna Fredda


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AoFJ-Q634nA

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 03:01 PM
PFM


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssAVUudm5Jk

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 03:05 PM
PFM live


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_5AO89qlWI

Soundchaser_413
12-23-2014, 10:42 PM
Glad to see some newer bands mentioned here. There are some good ones such as Il Tempio Delle Clissedre, Bacio delle Medusa, Pandora and although they aren't that new I think La Maschera Di Cera is really good. I am no expert though and need to discover more. The Italian scene is like a bottomless pit of music(heck even just the seventies by itself).

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 11:29 PM
Glad to see some newer bands mentioned here. There are some good ones such as Il Tempio Delle Clissedre, Bacio delle Medusa, Pandora and although they aren't that new I think La Maschera Di Cera is really good. I am no expert though and need to discover more. The Italian scene is like a bottomless pit of music(heck even just the seventies by itself).



Too true, Soundchaser. Maschera Di Cera is one of my favourite bands. Fabio Zuffanti is also in Finisterre and Hostsonaten, as well as putting out his own solo stuff which is equally good. He's sent me a few of his albums which kind of have a current vibe running through them


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlbUmP6zayg

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 11:31 PM
Just love this track from Lux Aide by Maschera Di Cera


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuM0siPUzK4

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 11:49 PM
Fabio with Hostsonaten - they've done a few album in relation with the seasons...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Pbm4YYfVIM

Hot Ego Selected
12-23-2014, 11:55 PM
... and Finisterre with the beautiful piece Lo Specchio


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfhhRrxm16U

Hot Ego Selected
12-24-2014, 12:16 AM
As said previously I had for a numbero f years moderated an Italian Prog page for those fans outside Italy and actually befriended a number of fine musicians from there. One guy from Italy who made friends on Facebook with me I hadn't even realised until much later that he had put out one of the pivotal solo albums back in the 70's. Nice bloke and what an amazing album about the hunt for Moby Dick. Stefano Testa and Una Vita from 'Una Vita Una Balena Bianca e Altre Cose'


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0oLlTCGQDg

Hot Ego Selected
12-24-2014, 12:19 AM
Stefano is still recording and one of his pieces I really enjoy is 'Io Con Te'


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pX5zhy1XJQ4

Hot Ego Selected
12-24-2014, 12:27 AM
Not so much prog rock as art rock Italian style, they've put out music for film as have a fair number of prog bands in Italy.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVdTtvDPTs0

Soundchaser_413
12-24-2014, 01:25 AM
[Back in the 70's they had full stadiums filled with prog fans. Not just any Prog fan though- you had to be (or seen to be) either Left-Wing or Right-wing depending which band you followed. One right wing band made the mistake of playing at a stadium where it was filled with Left wing fans and feared for their lives ]

I don't know if I believe this. Where did you get this information from(sources?). Can you give any specific examples(bands)?

Hot Ego Selected
12-24-2014, 02:51 AM
[Back in the 70's they had full stadiums filled with prog fans. Not just any Prog fan though- you had to be (or seen to be) either Left-Wing or Right-wing depending which band you followed. One right wing band made the mistake of playing at a stadium where it was filled with Left wing fans and feared for their lives ]

I don't know if I believe this. Where did you get this information from(sources?). Can you give any specific examples(bands)?


There's no reason why I would make this up but there are plenty of sites online to verify it if you so wish. I've read about it in various RPI related books as well as seen it in the Prog magazine interviewing a number of the old bands. You do realise Italy was going through some dynamic changes politically when prog (what they called pop music then) was starting. The Red Brigades and all the unrest between the Church (Right wing) and communists (Left Wing). A number of the rally's then invited youth to come and join in with musical iput from the various bands of the day. Not sure why you find this strange or untrue.

I did do a bit of googling and came up with


<tbody>
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2. The birth of a movement
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The turbulent times affected countless musicians looking for something new-some way to parallel the political climate through artistic media. Ranging from highly educated conservatory students to local singer-songwriters, this spirit managed to captivate an entire country within a few short years. Young people were restless, bursting with a burning desire to change the staid, suffocating atmosphere of Italian society starting with one of its symbols, its venerable musical tradition. Most musicians had more or less strong left-wing leanings (the prime example being Area), while the few examples of openly right-wing bands never managed to break out of obscurity, or gain more than a strictly cult following.
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Without a strong rock tradition in the 60s Italy had mainly produced beat bands of varying quality, as well as singers well-versed in the long-standing canzone tradition of the country. As the tidal wave of counter-culture swept in, it brought revolution not only in the form of progressive rock, but also differing forms of heavier, continental rock which was establishing itself around the same time. Psychedelic influences and the incorporation of classical music may have been the same stepping stones used by most other progressive scenes around the globe during the same period, but even at this embryonic stage there was a whiff of something else in the air. In the late 60s when the beat scene was already heading towards a decline, a number of bands formed, some of them releasing singles (or even albums) that bridged the gap between beat, conventional Italian easy listening music (musica leggera), and the new ideas coming from Great Britain - among them, New Trolls, Le Orme, Panna Fredda, I Quelli (later to become Premiata Forneria Marconi), Il Mucchio, and Fabio Celi e gli Infermieri.
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"We wanted to put some improvisations between the singing parts and we had to make up our minds about the style to follow... After having been to the Isle of Wight festival, it was clear to all of us that we couldn't keep on playing the usual songs with verses and refrains." -Toni Pagliuca, Le Orme

</tbody>
http://www.last.fm/tag/rock%20progressivo%20italiano/wiki/diff?b=2&a=1

Soundchaser_413
12-24-2014, 12:19 PM
Still disagree sorry. I see no correlation between politics and progressive music except maybe with the RIO bands(one of which was Italian- Stormy Six). But hey we can all think what we want. I'm not saying you are making things up. It's all about interpretation. I wasn't there and I can't say for sure(and neither were you) but I kind of doubt people were fighting about the music and saying "oh you can't play this because you are a left wing band" etc etc and "we are going to beat you up because you don't play the music we like." That's just highly suspect to me and nothing you have quoted here supports your original assertion. It even says most of the well known bands were left wing. I do agree things were probably turbulent though in regards to the times though. The quote about Le Orme just means they decided to change directions in music because they saw ELP not because they feared for their lives. Lol.

Hot Ego Selected
12-24-2014, 01:20 PM
Still disagree sorry. I see no correlation between politics and progressive music except maybe with the RIO bands(one of which was Italian- Stormy Six). But hey we can all think what we want. I'm not saying you are making things up. It's all about interpretation. I wasn't there and I can't say for sure(and neither were you) but I kind of doubt people were fighting about the music and saying "oh you can't play this because you are a left wing band" etc etc and "we are going to beat you up because you don't play the music we like." That's just highly suspect to me and nothing you have quoted here supports your original assertion. It even says most of the well known bands were left wing. I do agree things were probably turbulent though in regards to the times though. The quote about Le Orme just means they decided to change directions in music because they saw ELP not because they feared for their lives. Lol.


You might be right there. After all if a tree falls down in a forest and no one is there does it make a noise? comes into play. I didn't say they were fighting over the music they played, (although some of it had strong connotations towards various causes) but what political ideologies you happened to follow or be mixed up with, either by accident or by design. Certain bands were identified with various political factions by the fans, and whether you followed those politics or not band members risked getting beaten up by others. There was a kind of English Football tribal affiliation about it. And I did read of this as an example in the PROG magazine in their column 'Once Around The World' that devoted an articel to RPI, and how one of the members of a popular band at the time got caught up at the wrong concert with a large crowd of fans from one of the other opposition wings.

I guess you don't have to believe politics played a strong part in some of the well known bands in Italy if you haven't heard of it happening before. Perhaps this might enlighten further...

Here's a snippet from it by Andrea Parentin.

Rock Progressivo Italiano: An introduction to Italian Progressive Rock (http://www.amazon.com/Rock-Progressivo-Italiano-introduction-Progressive-ebook/dp/B006HKI6DA/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1419444179&sr=1-1)
ITALIAN PROGRESSIVE ROCK AND POLITICSThe political contraposition in Italy was so strong that the Italian musical scene couldn’t help but be deeply influenced by this atmosphere. The left wing was dominant in the music field, thanks to the organisation of concerts and to the links between some bands and the protest movements of the students. To go to a concert in the Seventies was considered a political act and you had to take precise, resolute positions. Furthermore, there was the tendency to judge the artists not because of the quality of their music but on the basis of ideological criteria and the bands that were not politically involved or whose commitment was not clear or was evanescent were frequently attacked [1]. Among the more committed and militant bands there were Area, Stormy Six and Osanna. Osanna even inserted a fragment of the communist anthem “Bandiera rossa” in the song “Mirror Train” on their debut album.

Lino Vairetti: - We were all supporters of the left wing except Elio D’Anna who supported the right. Anyway Elio wasn’t really a political militant so he agreed to insert that anthem in the album since our fans liked it [2]. Area lyrics were extremely politically committed and they also put some revolutionary and disquieting symbols in the art cover of their debut album, a hammer and sickle and a P38. Demetrio Stratos, singer of Area, from an old interview: - I contest many bands as PFM. Nowadays, in a historical moment when they throw bombs in Brescia and there are bomb attacks on trains, I find it rather stupid that they make such a kind of song as “Dolcissima Maria”, it’s absurd! Our music is violent because there’s violence in the streets [3].

For many people political commitment was a must and also artists who weren’t really interested in politics had to face this issue. PFM, for instance, trying to “surf” the wave of the movement in Italy lost the chance to achieve success abroad, especially in the USA where their American management didn’t understand why they took part in a concert pro PLO (Palestine Liberation Organization) just before the release of their album “Chocolate Kings” and of a scheduled tour in the USA. Mauro Pagani, multi instrumentalist of Premiata Forneria Marconi: - In Rome in 1975 we took part in a concert in support of the Palestinians. Nothing special, just one of the thousands concerts that were held in Italy in favour of one of many causes that deserved to be supported. But in some way we found ourselves on the front page of Billboard, the entertainment world bible. The headline of the article was “Pfm supports Plo” and they wrote that we organized concerts to buy weapons for the Palestinians who would have used them against Israel. You can imagine the reaction. Our manager for the West Coast was Bill Graham, he called our Italian manager Franco Mamone and just told him – Forget the West Coast![4]. Nevertheless PFM’s political commitment has never been explicit; Mauro Pagani was the member more in touch with the left wing movements and the band took part in many festivals organised by the left wing, but always without being directly linked to extra-parliamentary groups. Because of this indecision, along with the character of their manager Mamone and due to the attention that the band used to pay to market strategies, PFM was not very popular among political militants and didn’t get much support [5].

It would be wrong, however, to think that the whole Italian scene of the seventies was the expression of just one political party. There were many bands that drifted with the current, without feeling exceedingly involved and just following fashion. Giuseppe “Baffo” Banfi, keyboardist of Biglietto per l’Inferno: - Above all we were interested in playing our music. It’s true, those years were the years of the protest, in the pop festivals there was a left wing imprinting and we used to breathe it too. But we didn’t feel particularly involved on a political basis [6]. Other bands preferred not to openly side at the cost of undergoing ferocious criticism, as Le Orme. Toni Pagliuca: - We never professed any political faith. We never got involved with any political party, although we knew that Italian artists used to have a preference for the left wing and we were near the needs of the people too. For example, in our album “Contrappunti” in the song “Maggio”, we remarked that Christ and Marx were in some way bringer of the “same message”. In our songs we used to deal with prostitution and abortion but I remember that I was accused of “moralism”. Today I have to say that it pleases me, because today there is a total lack of any sense of morality. We were very moralist indeed and I’m still proud of it [7]. Claudio Simonetti, keyboardist of Goblin: - I remember that those years were marked by political issues, by all the after-effects of 1968, although I was never interested in politics for ethical reasons. Many artists used to exploit politics to promote their work and I found this very disturbing. I never had a political tendency. Musicians shouldn’t be just like everyone else and they shouldn’t be “pushed” by politicians [8].

Paolo Ferrarotti, drummer of Il Castello di Atlante: - In 1977 when Area came to play in Vercelli, we met Patrizio Fariselli, their keyboardist. We talked with him for a long time about our music and the possibility of making a record or playing professionally. He gave us the address of their record label (Cramps) and the name of a producer... We met the producer, I don’t remember his name, he listened to our music attentively and, at the end, said - Well, guys, the music is very good but we must work on the lyrics - Why?, we asked – There are no political topics, he answered. - Political topics??? - Yeah, our label is clearly on the left, we support bands that are on the same side - Ahhh… And we went away. The problem wasn’t left or right, we did not want to “dirty” our music with political topics! [9]. Anyway, the artists who didn’t take a position used to receive harsh criticism from the militant critics, as in the case of Il Volo, a band that collaborated with the singer-songwriter Lucio Battisti and lyricist Mogol who were accused of being supporters of the right wing (though this wasn’t really true). Alberto Radius, guitarist of Formula 3 and Il Volo: - The critics in that period were strongly influenced by political ideologies: Bertoncelli, Massarini, Giaccio were all excellent critics, but militant. According to them Mogol was a fascist and Lucio used to give the Roman salute, so they were constantly criticized. And then they had to expiate their most serious sin according to the militant critics of the left wing: they were to become billionaires [10].

Things got even worse for Museo Rosenbach, a band that was openly accused of fascism and practically forced to quit the scene because of the art cover of their album “Zarathustra” and because of their lyrics inspired by the philosopher Friederich Nietzsche. Alberto Moreno, bassist of Museo Rosenbach: - The seventies were extremely politicized, but these issues were the business of the individual members of the band. Museo Rosenbach, as a group, used to follow only a musical path, bound to English and American pop-rock or Italian bands as PFM and BMS. Area were open sided but they were an exception among the bands. We were aware of their commitment but we never thought to counterpoint their commitment with right wing oriented proposals... The face of Mussolini on the album cover was a choice of the art designer. The references to Nietzsche instead were clear and they were an important part of our message. In the original album jacket we tried to explain that you shouldn’t interpret Nietzsche as one of the inspirers of Nazism as they used to in those years. We read the philosopher in a different and “softer” way, without any forced political interpretation. Unfortunately our explanation wasn’t understood and we realized that sometimes images are more important than words. I admit that the black of the art cover and the bust of Mussolini didn’t help us. But we have paid for these ingenuities [11].

As I said before, Italian Progressive Rock was one of the voices of a whole generation, not only of the young people that were part of the political movements of the Italian left wing, and thus it was appreciated and practised also by the youth of the right wing and of the Christian movements, though with greater difficulty. Marcello Vento, drummer of Alberomotore and Canzoniere del Lazio: - Once they called us to perform in Turin. As soon as we arrived, we realized that the flags on the stage were of a different colour from those we used to play for. It was a festival organised by the “Fronte della Gioventł” (a youth movement of the right wing), so we turned back and returned to Rome. Perhaps they loved our music too, but we used to be so demanding and at the same time intransigent that we didn’t play [12]. Actually, there were also bands with political tendencies openly for the right wing, as Janus, Acroama or La Compagnia dell’Anello, but they didn’t have any commercial impact at all and they had to operate in almost “clandestine conditions”. Mario Bortoluzzi, singer of La Compagnia dell’Anello: - In 1974 we were overcome by the irrepressible desire to take a guitar in our hands and sing the life of our people that resisted the “red violence” daily at school, in the streets and at their workplaces. Nobody used to sing for those outcasts: we did so, with no financial backing but with rage and joy. Many of the musicians were, then as now, committed to left the wing. They were pushed by the labels. All we needed was a recorder, a basement where to rehearse and record our songs and the product was immediately distributed by a semi clandestine net composed of friends and friends of friends. Our aim was (and still is today), beyond every possibility of commercial use of the product, to give a voice to a common feeling, to the soul of a world that otherwise would be living without somebody expressing in music its wishes, ideals, hopes and dreams. In the beginning our technical means were rather poor although they were supported by an incredible, contagious enthusiasm. As we went on, an increased professionalism and the availability of better means improved the quality of alternative music products. The need to express a spiritual vision of life overdubbed the moment of pure and simple testimony. Since then La Compagnia dell’Anello (and many other bands of the musical movement of the right wing) began to become something that you could listen to also outside the “ghetto”. As time passed by, new members with a solid musicianship joined the original line-up... Our work is supported by three generations of friends that keep on singing our songs all over Italy and all this without any television appearances, pushes or external support [13].

The right wing movements organized their own festivals, called “Campi Hobbit”, and a circuit of concerts for the militants. Mario Ladich, drummer of Janus: - The Janus project was born in Rome in 1976 as an alternative to the overwhelming prominence of the left wing in the artistic field, at least in Italy... In 1977 we took part in the first “Campo Hobbit” in Montesarchio. People were shocked and divided about the possibility to play rock in the right wing milieu... Despite frequent accusations from the left wing, Janus was not a “Nazi-rock” band. One of our songs, “Dresda”, was about the allied bombing of a helpless city during World War II, almost forgotten by official history that instead only remembered the horrible crimes of the enemies. As far as I am concerned, our lyrics were never aggressive, there were no incitements to violence, even in the tragic atmosphere of the “years of lead”. In 1978, after the second Campo Hobbit, our best work was released, “Al maestrale”, in which Celtic, medieval, Mediterranean and hard rock influences were blended in an experimental form of European Rock as close as possible to the traditions of the right wing. Anyway, you can’t compare this album with the “Monsters of Rock”, we were just a non professional band without money and the recordings were made in almost live conditions (we recorded the album in six hours) [14].

The Christian movements in the seventies developed their alternative musical circuits too and some bands, as Metamorfosi, came out from the ambient of “Messe Beat”, masses where liturgical music was played on rock instruments. In fact, from the sixties, the Catholic Church began to be concerned that many young people were looking for other ways to spiritualism and abandoning the traditional religious habits so the Church tried to attract youngsters by introducing rock music during their services [15]. Davide “Jimmy” Spitaleri, vocalist of Metamorfosi: - Metamorfosi were formed in 1971 when I met I Frammenti, a band that used to play covers and “Messe Beat” a phenomenon very much in fashion in that period. I brought in some original stuff and from that moment we decided to take another way and to play nothing but our own music [16].

On 20th September 1973 Latte e Miele were the first rock band to play in front of the Pope in the Vatican City. Latte e Miele: - We were the first band in rock history to play live in front of the Pope, Paul VI... We were very young and we were not completely aware of the historic importance of being the first rock band in the world to do such a kind of thing. We played the whole album “Passio Secundum Mattheum”. After this performance we were labelled as “Catholic Beat” but we don’t agree with this definition. Some of us are believers while others are not. Everyone thinks in a different way. Many great musicians composed sacred music as, for instance, Bach or Mozart, but this has nothing to do with their personal opinions and faith. The Rolling Stones wrote “Sympathy For The Devil” but not for this reason should they necessarily be considered a “satanic” band... [17].

The extremists of the left wing used to consider the members of Catholic youth associations as Comunione e Liberazione or I Focolari fascists disguised as Christians to fight better their crusade against communism with the result that Christian bands were usually cut out of the main pop festivals [18]. Nonetheless some Christian prog bands as Genfuoco, Messaggio ’73, ATP or Quel Giorno di Uve Rosse were able to release their albums on independent labels linked to the Catholic Church [19]. Cesare Regazzoni, composer and keyboardist of ATP: - The band was born in Parma, at the San Benedetto Salesian institute. I was studying at the conservatory and I was the leading spirit for younger boys. Among them, some were able to sing and play too. So, at the beginning of the seventies, I managed to combine the singers’ and players’ groups in only one group... Slowly the band managed to take shape and trace some distinctive characteristics... At the beginning of 1977 maestro Eugenio Consonni, owner of the record label Eco Music decided to produce our debut album... In many cases the album tracks were recorded in just one take, since our label was small and poor. The rhythm section was recorded in one single day, followed by moog, guitars and vocals... We played concerts for about one year afterwards, not without difficulty due to the members’ commitments of study and work. But on the other hand we were always warmly welcomed by our followers...[20].





Genfuoco had the chance to perform live all around Europe in alternative circuits as Genfest. Genfuoco: - We started in the late sixties playing covers of the international band Gen Rosso re-arranged according to our own taste. Later we began to write original music. Our lyrics came out from personal experiences and were about justice, love, peace, nature, ecology... During the seventies our music turned to progressive rock and in 1979 we released an album, “Dentro l’invisibile”, for the label Cittą Nuova. On stage we used to set free our creativity, even inviting the public to take part in jam sessions. The people who couldn’t play could express themselves by dancing or painting. In our concerts you could find paper and colours to paint something inspired by the music. We had the chance to play live not only in Italy but also in France, Austria, Germany, Belgium and Spain [21]. Of course, the atmosphere and the public of the Genfest circuit was very different from other pop festivals...

(From the book Rock Progressivo Italiano: an introduction to Italian Progressive Rock (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?_encoding=UTF8&sort=relevancerank&search-alias=books&ie=UTF8&field-author=Andrea%20Parentin))

EtherReal
12-24-2014, 07:18 PM
From one of the current crop of RPI artists, Maschera Di Cera


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CTm8CJGjtno

This is superb.

EtherReal
12-24-2014, 08:23 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUxUFuE7JjM

EtherReal
12-24-2014, 08:24 PM
Cantano Adora.

EtherReal
12-24-2014, 08:25 PM
Or is it Cantinho da dora?

Hot Ego Selected
12-26-2014, 01:17 PM
re: Maschera Di Cera


This is superb.

Not a dud song on this album - Lux Ade is one of the definitive Rock Progressivo Italiano albums.

Here's another track from the album - Orpheus


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wKTRdYcLuI

EtherReal
12-26-2014, 09:38 PM
re: Maschera Di Cera



Not a dud song on this album - Lux Ade is one of the definitive Rock Progressivo Italiano albums.

Here's another track from the album - Orpheus


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wKTRdYcLuI

By the way I completely believe that the Italian music scene would have been politicized in the 70's. This was the nation that had suffered Mussolini and the Red Brigades kidnapping the wealthy class. There are sizeable Marxist undercurrents in Italy to this day and you can bet there are quasi Fascist business groups as well aka the Mafia. I know for a fact being a "Marxist" is quite popular with a wide range of groups there including students. In America and Canada that kind of talk is quite fringe to put it mildly and gets Wolf Blitzered at every turn. Our media is so spin merchant sanitized that we have a culture that cannot have a grown up conversation about such things. That is not because we are prohibited from doing so but rather that kind of discourse has been made culturally irrelevant and is above our reading level.